Browsing articles from "March, 2011"

Tuesday: Asia Day

Mar 15, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Music: The children participated in a traditional Korean dance accompanied by music.

The children learned how to say yes (ne)  and no (aniyo) in Korean. I asked the children yes or no questions in order to test their knowledge of their two new vocabulary words. For example, I asked Ben, “Do you like to go to the corner?” and he said “Aniyo!” I asked Brogan “Do you like candy” and he said “Ne!”

I shared with the children that in Asia, the eldest in the house is considered the most wise, and therefore makes the most important decisions. I explained that since grandparents still live with their family, their grandmothers and grandfathers  make all of the important decisions, like what sports the children will play, where they will go to school, and where they will live.

I taught the children how to say “Hello” in Korean which is “Annyong!” I showed the children how easy it will be to talk to Miss Kristen on Skype even though I will be so far away. We called my friend on Skpye who lives in Rwanda and the children said “Annyong!” to her.

The Korean culture values community living more so than the American culture. It is a custom to not pour your own drink. When being served a drink one must hold the cup with both hands and the person pouring the drink must hold the craft with both hands as well. We practiced this with the tea set by having three people hold their teacups with both hands and having another person pouring the tea with both hands.

When entering a Korean home, the first thing you do is remove your shoes. We pretended that the lesson area was our house. All of the children stood outside of the lesson area and removed their shoes before sitting down. When the first night of the new year comes in Korea everybody hides their shoes. This is because there is a belief that a ghost will come down and try on every one’s shoes. If the ghost finds a pair it likes it will take it. It is though that the owner of the shoes will then have bad luck for the whole year. The children took turns playing the ghost. Everyone pretnded to fall asleep, while the ghost tried on everyone’s shoes and then chose a pair to take with them. The children woke up and tried to figure out with shoes the ghost had taken.

Shoe and Tell: The children were asked to bring something that reminded them of Asia. The children brought in Nunchucks, chopsticks, and lots of clothes made in Asia.

Friday: Feet and Claws

Mar 12, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar  in English and Spanish. Mallory was the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She found the day of the week in Spanish, added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather.  She reviewed her colors in English, Spanish and Sign Language:  green, red, yellow, brown, orange, black, white, pink, purple.  She told us the words in Sign language and Spanish:  eat, snow, thank you, please, more, friend, bug, milk, smile, up, love, all done.

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.Brainstorm/Fun Facts:Discussed: What can you do with your feet? The children said that they could walk, kick, swim, run, and dance with their feet. I explained that birds use their claws and feet to balance, climb, hold onto objects, fish, catch prey and dig

Chit Chat: Discussed: What do you think a bird’s foot looks like? The children described a bird’s foot to have sharp claws and to be rough. I explained that some birds have webbed feet (like ducks) while others have sharp talons (like eagles and owls) ans still others have little tiny  feet with tiny claws.

Patterns:Discussed :Why do you think a flamingo stands on one foot? I showed the children the calendar and encouraged them to try and find the pattern. They found that the level one pattern was bird, bird, egg bird, bird and that the level 2 pattern was blue jay, blue jay, white egg, blue crane, blue crane. I showed the children the Flamingo Pattern Card and invited the children to say the pattern aloud. I invited the children to pretend to be a flamingo and follow the foot pattern. I had the children stand on one foot and hopped once. We then placed both feet on the ground. Then we stood on the other foot and hopped once. We started off really slow and then got faster.

Book Worm: Discussed: How do you think a bird’s foot print might look different than your foot print? The children said that their footprint would have 5 toes and toenails. A bird’s foot print would have long claws and they would have less claws than human toes. I distributed the Rebus Reader cards to the children. I told the children that whenever I read the word on their card they had to hold it up in  the air and say their word. We read through the story and learned that flamingos stand on one leg to see the fish better. When the flamingos stand on one leg in the water the fish mistake it for a stick.

Closing Time:Discussed: Can you show me a fancy way you can move your feet? The children then preceded to have a dance party where they showed Miss Kristen their fancy moves.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Hula Hoops and Tunnels!

Thursday: Wings

Mar 10, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: Discussed: What would you do if your arms were wings? The children said that they would fly all over the world. Ben and Grady decided that they would fly to Texas together. Ava said that she would fly around the city. Discussed: Where do you think you might see a nest? I explained that nests can be just about anywhere: trees, ground, rocks, etc.

Book Worm:I showed the children the Hands-on letter N and  asked them to repeat the name and the sound it makes. I showed them the Phonic Tags and invited the children to repeat the names of each. I asked the children to hide as I taped the nest tag somewhere in the front room. I then had the children search for the tag.

Book Worm: Discussed: What would make you scared enough to fly away? The children said they would be scared of lions, tigers, bears, snakes, and stingrays. I showed the children each Sight Word Circle and asked them to repeat the words. I taped the circles on the wall. I read the story aloud, pointed to the Sight Words each time they read one of the words and invited the children to say it with me.

Social Skills: What can you do now that you couldn’t do when you were a baby?  The children sadi that when they were a baby they could not walk or eat big kid food. I explained to the children that some birds have to wait for flying feathers on their wings before they can learn to fly. I showed the children the Gosling and invited them to repeat, “patient.” I placed a feather on the floor in front of each child and asked him/her to wait to touch it. We counted to 17 together and I then allowed the children to pick up their feathers. I encouraged the children to pretend to fly.

Show and Tell:  The children were asked to bring 17 items one of which had to start with the letter N. I had the children count out their items and identify which ones started with the letter N.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Little People!Center 2:The children circled their Sight Words in their “I Can Read” books.

Wednesday: Body

Mar 9, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Mallory was the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She found the day  of the week in Spanish, added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather.  She reviewed her colors in English, Spanish and Sign Language:  green, red, yellow, brown, orange, black, white, pink, purple.  She told us the words in Sign language and Spanish:  eat, snow, thank you, please, more, friend, bug, milk, smile, up, love, all done.

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:Discussed: What colors have you seen on birds? I explained that the color of a bird’s body helps camouflage the bird so it can blend in with its surroundings to stay safe.

Listening: Discussed: Have you ever found a treasure outside? What was it? The children said that they had found pretty rocks and bugs. I read the children the story of “The Mystery of the Missing Eggs.” I had the children hold the  the eggs and mimic the facial expressions as prompted in the story. The children figured out the mystery that all of the different color eggs had hatched into birds with corresponding colors.

Book Worm:Discussed: What are some of the parts on the body of a bird? I explained that all birds have feathers, feet, wings and a tail. They are all different sizes and colors. Birds have three different types of feathers: contour, down, and flight feathers. Down feathers keep the bird warm. Flight feathers  are the first five feathers in the wing. Without these, they cannot fly. If you find a feather on the ground, it is probably a contour feather. I showed the children one of each of the Matching Game’s cards and shared the name of the body part or bird. I placed one of each card face down and the rest around the room on the floor. I invited the children to choose a card and move that body part as they looked for another similar or matching card. For example, if they drew a wing, they looked for another wing.

Life Science: Discussed: Where does a baby bird come from? I showed the children the Egg stage of the Life Cycle Wheel. I invited children to squat low, roll into a ball and pretend to be an egg. I asked a child to turn the wheel and invited the children to pretend to hatch and stretch out their wings. I asked a child to turn the wheel again and pretend to grow feathers. I asked a child to turn the wheel again and fly out of their nest. I continued with each stage as children pretended to fly and build a nest.

Closing Time:Discussed: If you were a bird, what would be your favorite part of your body? The children gave me answers like head, wings, tail, and beak. I sang this song to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”: “Feathers, feathers, can you see the feathers all over me? Feathers make me unique everywhere but my beak. Feathers, feathers, can you see the feathers all over me?”

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:Lacings! Center 2: The children made a bird by decorating the body and gluing on the feathers, eye, and craft stick.

Monday: Learning to Fly

Mar 9, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Mallory is the calendar girl for this week and she put up the numbers on the calendar.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:   Discussed:  When do you think birds learn to fly?  Explained that when birds are born they have soft feathers that keep them warm.  As they grow they get “flying feathers” and are referred to as “fledglings”.  We acted out a rhyme that the children participated in.

Speaking: Discussed:How do you think birds learn to fly? I explained that birds learn to fly with instinct and pratice, like when we learn to walk. I demonstrated and practiced the help sign which they made by holding their left hand out, palm up and closing their right hand into a fist and placing on their left palm as they raised both hands together.

Emergent Writing: Discussed: What color would you like your flying feathers to be if you were a bird? I invited the children to use their hands in the air to make the flowing feathers lines like the ones on the Practice Pal Strip. I encouraged the children to say, “flap” as they moved their hand in a deep “u” shape. Two dips would be  “flap, flap”, etc. All of the children practiced their “b”s on a dry erase board.

Pysical Science: Discussed: How do you think adult birds help teach fledglings to fly? I explained that when the adult birds know their babies can fly, they stop bringing them food. This encourages the birds to leave their nest to get food. I poured the bird seed into a bowl. Each child had a turn to come to the front of the lesson area and pretend to be a baby bird. I had the children imagine that they were up in a tree and their mama bird had stopped bringing them food. The baby birds had to jump down off of the stool and “fly” to get the bird food on the ground.

Logic: I placed the owl number pieces on the ground. I asked the children to choose a numbered card, flip it over and say the number. I then invited that child to find and count out the same number of feathers. The children gave the flying feathers to the baby owl by placing them in the bag. We pretended that the owl was learning to fly around the room then back to the nest.

Closing Time: Discussed: What do your parents help you learn. The children explained that their parents helped them learn how to ride a bike , how to read and how to count.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Cardboard Blocks!Center 2: The children tape the Practice Pal bird to the strip together. They then practive their  tracing and writing their letter B.  

Tuesday: Head and Beak

Mar 8, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.

Songs: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Mallory was the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She found the day  of the week in Spanish, added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather.  She reviewed her colors in English, Spanish and Sign Language:  green, red, yellow, brown, orange, black, white, pink, purple.  She told us the words in Sign language and Spanish:  eat, snow, thank you, please, more, friend, bug, milk, smile, up, love, all done.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: Today the children learned about the head and beaks of birds. The beak, or the bill, is used for eating, grooming, manipulating objects, killing prey, probing food, courtship and feeding young.

Visual Art: Discussed: How does a bird use a beak? I explained that a bird not only uses its beak to pick up food but also to crack nuts and grain, climb, poke, pierce, move things, carry nesting materials, build, feed young, scoop up water, defend itself, tap messages, groom and feel. A beak is very important for a bird. We discussed the beak we would be creating for our centers.

Shapes:Discussed: How would a blue jay look differently if he had the beak of a woodpecker? I placed the body pieces on the floor. I invited children to choose one of the head parts for the bird and place it above the body. I asked Ben to choose one of the cards with a bird bottom and place it under the body. We brainstormed different names for the new birds. We mix and matched all of the different bird parts.

Social Skills: What bird parts could you see if you only saw a bird’s shadow or outline? The children said that they would be able to see the head, beak, and feet. What bird features could you not see? We discussed you could not see the feathers or the color of the eyes or beak. Using a large piece of paper, the children traced around the bodies of Samuel, Gretchen, Mallory, and Ella. The children then drew in the parts that you could not see from the outline like the eyes and mouth.

Closing Time: Discussed: What do you think is the most important part of the head? The children decided that the mouth is the most important because you need it to eat.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:Puzzles! Center 2: The children painted a paper cone cup orange, snipped off the end, and tided string on to create a beak Center 3: The children made bird feet by cutting the pattern, painting the feet, cutting cellophane pieces and glue between the toes to create  webbed feet. The children then traced around their foot and cut a “u” shape at the heel.

Friday: Bird Food

Mar 7, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Averee was the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She found the day  of the week in Spanish, added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather.  She reviewed her colors in English, Spanish and Sign Language:  green, red, yellow, brown, orange, black, white, pink, purple.  She told us the words in Sign language and Spanish:  eat, snow, thank you, please, more, friend, bug, milk, smile, up, love, all done.

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: Discussed: What do you think a bird eats? The children said they thought a bird eats worms and bird seeds. When making a bird house it is important to consider having the house 5 feet off the ground to protect certain birds from predators. It is also important if you have a bird house to only fill it with enough bird seed for a day to prevent it from spoiling and having harmful effects on the birds.

Listening: Discussed: What would you like to learn about birds?The children said that they wanted to learn how birds can fly, peck, and what birds eat. I explained that some books give us information instead of just telling a story. Informational books can help us learn. I laid the bird food cards on the floor. I showed the children the “About Birds: A Guide for Children” book. I had them identify the title, author, illustrator, the front cover, back cover, and the title page. They read the story and on each page, I had the children pretend to feed the birds with the bird food pieces of a fish, a flower, a worm, and a slug.

Environmental Science:  Discussed: How does the weather affect what type of food a bird eats. The children said that a bird might have trouble finding food in the snow because every thing is frozen. I explained that in some places cold weather freezes the ground and lakes while in other places sun can dry up food sources. Birds eat what they can find. I had each child draw a Weather Stick. They told me what kind of food they could find in that type of weather.

Numbers: Discussed: How do you think a bird finds worms? The children said that birds find worms by pecking in trees or digging in the grass. I explained that birds have special eyesight and notice the slightest movement in the grass and worm holes. I scattered 7 worms on the ground. I invited the children to fly around the room. When they saw a worm they placed their hands on their mouths, bent over to pick up a worm and brought it to their “nest”.

Show and Tell: The children were asked to bring in a birthday card  for Miss Kristen. They each had an opportunity to present their card to Miss Kristen.

 Closing Time: Discussed: What kind of things do birds eat? The children told me that they eat fish, nectar, worms, slugs, and other small bugs.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Tunnels and Hula-Hoops! 

 

Thursday: Hatchling

Mar 4, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about eggs.  The children did not know what a hatchling was.  Discussed how a bird hatches out of an egg and then that the hatchling was the new baby bird.   Discussed:  How does a bird get out of the egg?  Explained that birds have a hard point on the end of the beak called an “egg tooth”  which they use to break the shell and work their way out.  We acted out the rhyme:  “Out of an egg came a baby bird. He opened his mouth, but couldn’t say a word. He tried and tried, and tried once more.  Then out came a “tweet” as loud as a roar!”

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  How big is the biggest bird?  How big is the smallest bird?  (We used the theme poster to decide)  Explained that birds are all different sizes just like people.  We looked at the capital and lowercase hands-on letter Bb.  Discussed the sound that it makes.  We also discussed words that start with B.

Emergent Writing:  Discussed:  If you were a bird, what color would you want your eggs to be?  We looked at our journals and discussed how we would take the oval foam shape and place it behind the page.  They would then take a crayon and lay it on its side to do a rubbing on the page.  They would watch the Oval appear.

Numbers:  Discussed:  How many eggs do you think a bird can lay?  Explained that different birds lay a different amount of eggs at one time.  Eggs born in the same session (could last for days) are called a “clutch” and there are generally 1-20 eggs in a clutch.  We looked at the hands-on number 7.  We counted to 7 in English and Spanish.  We then counted all the oval eggs on the counting card.  Show and Tell: The children were asked to bring in 7 items one of which began with the letter “B”.  Each child came up one at a time to count out their items.  We helped them decide if they got to the number 7 or needed more or less.  We then discussed the items that they had that started with the letter B.

Social Skills: Discussed: Do you think hatchlings can fly? The children all agreed that hatchlings could not fly. I explained that the feathers on a hatchling are too fuzzy and small. They must wait in the nest until they grow their “flying feathers,” then they can fly with the flock. Birds often fly in groups called “flocks.” When the flock is flying a long distance they make a “V” shape and have a leader to help keep them together. I had the children form a “V” shape. We had one person stand in the center and be the leader, and led the flock around the room.

Closing Time: Discussed: Would you rather be an adult bird or a baby bird? Averee said that she would rather be a baby bird because they are so cute. Grady said that he would rather be an adult bird because they can fly. We sang the lyrics below to the tune of “Frere Jacques”: “Little egg, little egg, open up, open up. Time to be a hatchling, time to spread your little wings. Open up, open up.”

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Little People! Center 2: The children painted a bird cut out with a gummy worm. Center 3: Using their Little Journals, the children placed a foam oval shape under their page and rubbed over it with the side of a crayon to make an egg rubbing.

Wednesday: Eggs

Mar 4, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

 Brainstorm/Fun Facts: Today we learned about bird eggs. Discussed: How big do you think the largest bird egg is? The children said as big as a car. I explained that eggs can be all sizes-just like birds. The smallest bird egg is about the size of a jelly bean (hummingbird egg) and the largest is a little bigger than an American football (ostrich egg). The children recited this rhyme together and the children took turns inserting their name in the song: “Five little eggs lying in a nest, one started to wiggle, then the rest. Watch them each crack- 1,2,3,4,5. Five little birdies were hiding inside! Look at the Gradybird, isn’t he so sweet? Tweet,tweet, a tweetie-lee-tweet!”

Book Worm: Discussed: What kind of animal do you think would try to hurt a bird or its egg? The children said that bears, snakes, and dinosaurs would try to eat a bird and its egg. I showed the children the Rhyme Time Poster of “Little Robin Red Breast”. I had Ava and Grady act out the rhyme.

Patterns: Discussed: How do you know which egg belongs to each bird. Ben and Grady explained that you can find which bird eggs go together by finding eggs with a similar size and color. I explained that many eggs look similar, but each bird lays eggs that are just a little bit different. Eggs can be many colors shapes and sizes. I showed the children the foam shapes and asked them to repeat the color and shape. I asked several children to sort the blue and white foam eggs into either the blue or white bowl.

Physical Science:Discussed: How do you think a bird keeps its eggs warm. Ben said that a bird sits on its egg. I explained that some birds sit on their eggs to keep them warm, other birds might cover or bury their eggs and some birds like the penguins, keep the eggs close to their bodies to keep them warm. I hid the Look and Find Glasses under three pillows and had the children come up to the front of the lesson area and pick a pillow. Each one of the Look and Find Glasses had an item to find on the Theme Poster or a question. The Look and Find Glasses said: Which bird is your favorite color? Count the birds. Count the eggs in the nest. What color are the spots on the eggs? What kind of food is in the feeders? What other bird food can you find? What color is each pair of binoculars? What else can you use to watch birds?

Closing Time: Discussed: What do you think is inside an egg? The children said birds were inside eggs. We sang this song to the tune of “Mary Had a Little Lamb”: “Brogan had a little egg, little egg, little eggs. Brogan had a little egg, I wonder what’s inside.”

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:Library Books and Waffle Blocks! Center 2: The children decorated their egg cut out with a white crayon and then painted their egg with water colored paint to reveal their secret message or picture.

Tuesday: Nest

Mar 1, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Averee is the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She found the day  of the week in Spanish, added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather.  She reviewed her colors in English, Spanish and Sign Language:  green, red, yellow, brown, orange, black, white, pink, purple.  She told us the words in Sign language and Spanish:  eat, snow, thank you, please, more, friend, bug, milk, smile, up, love, all done.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:This month we will be learning about Birds and Eggs.  Today we will be discussing bird’s Nests!  The children all told me what they know about a nest!  We looked at a real nest and pictures of nests.  Discussed:  What might you find in a nest?  Explained that a nest is where animals, such as birds live, lay eggs and raise baby animals.  Fun facts:  A bird nest is the spot in which a bird lays and incubates its eggs and raises its young.  They build the nests out of mud, sand, twigs, grass, or even make a hole in a tree. Each child went and got a ball to sit behind them.  I did the rhyme and had a different child act it out. They would fly to their egg “ball” and sit on it.  Rhyme words:  Up in a tree, trying to hide, Was a little nest with eggs inside, When back flew Andrew bird, all alone, He sat on the eggs to keep them warm.

Visual Arts: Discussed:  What would you do if you found a nest?  Explained that if you come across a nest during a walk or at home, it is best to look but don’t touch.  We looked at our Art projects that they would be doing in afternoon centers.  We made a nest on the floor with a large blanket. We brought three balls to our nest.  The children each took turns sitting on the balls, “eggs”, to keep them warm. 

Speaking:  Looked at the new Theme Poster and discussed all the birds we saw.  Discussed:  Which bird would you want to be in the poster?  Each child was to wear white today.  Each child came up and took the white wand one at a time.  They pointed to all the white on their clothing and then found something white in the room.  Discussed White in Spanish and Sign language.

Shapes:  Discussed:  What kinds of animals do you think come out of eggs?  Explained that many animals come from eggs, not just birds. (Some examples: turtles, alligators, geckos, snakes, insects, and many more.)  We looked at the Shape Surpise Box.  The children had to guess what shape they thought was inside.  They all guessed correctly.  We looked at the shape, “oval”.  Show and Tell:  Each child was to bring an item that was an oval.  They came up one at a time and showed their item to the class.  They discussed what their item was and what shape it was.

Chit Chat:  Discussed:  How do you think nests keep baby birds safe? 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Lincoln Logs  Center 2: Nest of Eggs:  The children will paint the chick and the egg as desired.  They will tape the chick to the bottom of the egg.   and connect the top shell with a brass fastener.  They will then glue on some easter grass to the bottom of the egg to represent the nest.  Center 3: Name tags:  The children will practice writing their names on the name tag and then decorate it.

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