Browsing articles from "October, 2011"

Friday: Raft

Oct 28, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Finn put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Reviewed our sign language words: touch, shoe, water, eat, banana, apple.

Songs:   Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about submarines.  Every child told me what they know about rafts.  Explained that a raft is a flat boat often made of logs or sticks that are tied together.  Life rafts are used to help people stranded in the middle of the ocean!  Fun Facts:  From prehistoric times to the 19th century rafting was an important means of transportation.  Originally, several logs, bound together by vines, strips of animal skin, and later rope, formed a flat surface upon which goods and people could move across bodies of water.  Large rafts are still used occasionally on the Pacific coast to float lumber along the coastline.

Emergent Writing:  Discussed:  What shapes do you think you might see on the ocean?  Each child took a class book page and had to design a picture from the sea.  They could use scrap paper to rip or tear and turn into things.  They also added sea creatures.  I wrote what they told me that they learned about the ocean this month on their pictures that they drew.  They also told me what they wanted the front cover of the class book to look like and Miss Corrie drew that.

Social Skills:  Discussed:  How do you think people might use rafts?  Explained that some of the reasons a raft is used are: to move short distances on the water, to transport objects, or as a life saving device.  I placed our foam mat letters around the room and they will be our rafts.  I played the music and the children had to run around the rafts without touching them.  When the music stopped they had to hurry to a raft so they didn’t sink.   I removed one raft at a time so that one child would not have a raft.  We played this till we got down to one child who was the winner.  We had a tie between Ben and Will because they both reached the last raft at the exact same time.

Emergent Writing: Discussed:  What do you like best about the ocean?  I showed them Miss Corrie’s postcard that she wrote the the children.  We discussed her postcard and why she made it.  They had to draw on their postcard in afternoon centers about what they liked best about the ocean and write a note.

Music:   Discussed:  How do you think a raft can move faster or slower?  Did you know that the currents and wind can affect how quickly a boat moves?  All the children sat in a line facing each other’s back.  They pretended to be a big row boat.  We practiced rowing slow and fast.  I played the Circle Time CD “Row Your Boat”. When I told them the wind started blowing then they had to row really fast.  When the wind stopped blowing they began to row slow.  We sang the song while we rowed our boat.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play or Legos

Thursday: Submarine

Oct 27, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Finn added the number to the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We reviewed the sign language words:  eat, shoe, water, banana, apple, touch.

Songs:  Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about fishing boats yesterday.  Today the children told me what they know about Submarines. Discussed: Submarines are boats that go completely underwater.  Fun Facts:  In their history, submarines were called many names such as ‘eel boats’, ‘plunging boats’, ‘devil divers’ and ‘pig boats’.  A submarine is a ship, but it has been called a boat.  Nuclear Submarines are faster submerged than surfaced and can operate for over 10 years on one fueling.  Submarines in today’s U.S. Navy are nearly two football fields long and weigh 18,750 tons. That’s as heavy as 12,000 cars!

Social Skills:  Discussed:  What do you do when you see a mess? Do you help clean up, even when you didn’t make the mess?  How can the ocean get messy?  We discussed how to help clean up the daycare toys instead of us continually getting after them to clean up and how many dollars they could get.  I threw trash “paper” all over the room!  The children told me what they would have to do and where to put it.  They then each ran around the room picking up the trash and placing it in the trashcan.  Discussed them having a community clean-up day with their parents.

Patterns:  Discussed:  How do you think you could measure how deep the ocean is?  Shared that some boats use things like echolocation (a machine sends out a signal and listens for how long it takes to come back).  I then called out a sound and invited the children to echo me back and they could wait longer if they wanted to be deeper in the ocean.  We looked at a ruler and looked at the numbers and counted.    I poured some water into different containers and the children estimated how deep it was in inches.  We then used the ruler to find out the exact depth.

Physical Science:  Discussed:  How do you think a submarine dives under water?  Submarines make itself heavier by taking on water, and exchanging the water for air to get lighter again.  I showed them a bottle and asked them if it would float or sink.  I then placed it in a big bucket of water and we saw that it would float.  I then filled the bottle full of water and the children told me what they thought it would do.  It sank!  I then filled it half full and we discussed!  Show and Tell:  The children were to bring items that sunk or floated.  Each child came up and told me what they thought their item would do in the water and we then watched that item in the water. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  How do you think you can see out of a submarine?  Submarines have windows on the side to see what  is in the ocean.  To see what is above the ocean, a submarine uses a periscope.  We looked at the Submarine art that they will be doing in aftern0on centers. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Random Toys  Center 2: Submarine Art-  They will punch out the periscopes and add to the slits on the submarine.  They will then draw pictures of people or ocean creatures in the windows of the submarine.  Center 3:  Postcard- The children drew a picture of their favorite sea creature, ocean vehicle or other ocean memory on the postcard.  They then shared what they learned.

Wednesday: Fishing Boat

Oct 26, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Finn was not here today so Miss Kim did the calendar.  We discussed the weather and added the number to the calendar.  We reviewed our sign language words

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about shipwrecks and ocean liners.  The children told me what they know about Fishing Boats.  Discussed:  Have you ever tried to catch a fish?  Fun Facts:  Fishing boats come in many different shapes and sizes.  Some are created for commercial purposes while others are meant for leisure fishing only.  Jon Boats length ranges from 10 to 18 feet.  The bass boats are specifically used by farmers for very thin waters  and its size ranges from 9.5 to 12 feet.  We looked at these measurements on a measuring tape.

Learning Approach:  Discussed:  What do you think fishing boats do with the sea creatures they catch?  Did you know that many working boats sell the seafood they catch to markets and restaurants?  Some fishing boats catch fish and then let them go again.  We had two bowls and pretended to catch a sea creature.  Each child came up and caught the brain box which they pretended was the sea creature.  They shook the bowls and let the brain box go and followed the directions on whatever side the box landed on. Brain Box Action to do on each side:  Swim to something blue in the room; Find something purple in the room; Make a triangle with your body; Wiggle your fish tail 3 times; Jump like a dolphin; wave your arms 4 times.

Learning Approach:  Discussed:  If you were on a fishing boat, what do you think you would like to do?  Explained that there are many jobs on a boat, from running the ship and giving orders to catching the fish and following orders. We looked at the little learning cards and discussed each one:  Oo, Dd, purple, blue, Ss, 3, Triangle, 4.

Health and Safety:  Discussed:  What type of seafood have you tasted?  We made a soup and discussed how we had to wash our hands before we made it.  We looked at canned minced clams!  Each child got to feel it, smell it and taste it if they wanted to.  I was to put those in the soup but chose not to as I wasn’t sure the kids would be a fan of it.  We used potatoes instead.  We mixed cream of celery soup, cream of potato soup, canned potatoes, 1 1/2 cup milk and salt and pepper to taste in a large pot.  They will get to try this soup with their lunch.

Patterns:  Discussed:  What is the biggest fish you have ever seen?  Shared that when fishing, if you catch too small of a fish, you must put it back and let it continue to grow.  We looked at the three various size of fish and the three fishing poles with three different sizes of fishing line.  We put the fish in order from biggest to smallest and smallest to biggest.  I then picked one child at a time to get a certain size of fishing line and catch a certain size of fish.  Examples:  Get the fishing pole with the longest fishing line and catch the biggest fish; get the fishing pole with the medium fishing line and catch the smallest fish, etc. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2:  Little Learning Cards:  They will color and cut out all the learning cards.

Tuesday: Ocean Liner/Shipwreck

Oct 25, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Finn put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We reviewed our sign language words: touch, eat, water, shoe, apple, banana.

Songs:  Sang morning gathering songs, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about scuba divers.  The children told me what they know about ocean liners or shipwrecks.  They were not able to answer this question.  Discussed:  Why do you think some ships sink?  They had difficulty with this question also.  Shipwrecks can be caused by many problems:  rocks, wars, fires, storms, etc.  We looked at pictures of shipwrecks and ocean liners.  Fun Facts:  An ocean liner is a ship designed to transport people from one seaport to another along a regular long distance maritime routes according to a schedule.  Liners may also carry cargo or mail, and may sometimes be used for other purposes.  Ocean liners are usually strongly built with a high free-board to withstand rough seas and adverse conditions encountered in the open ocean, having large capacities for fuel, food and other consumables on long voyages.  Shipwreck is what remains of a ship that has wrecked, either sunk or beached.  One of the most famous modern sea disasters was the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

Physical Science:  Discussed:  What do you think it might look like on the bottom of the ocean?  Did you know that the ocean floor is different at different depths?  There are some places where the bottom is sandy (near the shore), it is silty (like mud and muck) in the deep and in the deepest parts there are mountains, caves and volcanoes.  We looked at the Discover Senses Project and discussed how they would make it this afternoon.

Environmental Science:  Discussed:  How do you think the captain knows where to go in the middle of the ocean?  Did you know that ship captains used to use the stars to get around?  Now most boats use satellite and GPS systems to follow their path.  I showed them my GPS on my phone.   We had a path made outside in the back yard.  We pretended to be a big ship and held on to each others hips.  We pretended to be an ocean liner navigating through the sea through the rocky path.  At the end they ran into a rock and we sank!! 

Emergent Reading:   Discussed:  What would you do if you were in a ship that tipped?  I wrote the word family “ip” on the wipe off board and we discussed the sound of each letter.  We then blended the sounds together to say the word.  I showed them how to add different letters to the beginning of “ip” and that the “ip” sound did not change.  Each child practiced reading new words: lip, tip, ship, chip, dip, etc… We had a large box that we turned into a “ship”.  I let the kids take turns pushing each other in the “ship” and making it “tip”.

Patterns:  Discussed:  Why do you think some boats are big and others are small?  The children couldn’t answer this question.  We discussed all the reasons.  Did you know that an ocean liner is a really big ship that was designed to carry many people, cargo and mail long-distances across the oceans?  I had the children look around the room and find the biggest item and then they found the smallest item.  I had a pile of toys and had the children separate them into to piles: big-little. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2:  Discover Senses Project-  The children will cut or tear triangles and add them to their ocean floor.  They will then glue on some black sand.  They can also draw different ocean life in their pictures. 

Monday: Scuba Diver

Oct 24, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.   Finn is the new calendar and weather boy for this week.  He put the numbers on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.

Songs:   Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Fish on Friday.  Each child told me what they know about a scuba diver.  They had a difficult time with this.  I showed them pictures of a scuba diver to help them understand what it was.  I told them that I am a scuba diver.  Discussed:  What do you think it would be like to dive into the ocean?  Explained that divers use gear to help them explore the ocean.  Deep sea divers use weights to go deeper.  Fun Facts:  The word S.C.U.B.A. is an acronym for Self-Contained-Underwater-Breathing-Apparatus.  The term scuba originated during WWII . It was used to describe navy divers who used oxygen re-breathers to attack enemy ships from underwater.  To scuba you will need a tank filled with a compressed breathing gas, a scuba regulator, a scuba mask, snorkel and fins.  We looked at Miss Kim’s scuba mask and snorkel. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What would you wear if you were a diver?  Explained that in order to dive under the ocean, divers need a mask, flippers, tanks, weights and snorkels.  We looked at pictures of all the diving gear and the children named all of it.  We looked at their art project that they will be making this afternoon.

Gross Motor:  Discussed:  How do you think scientists learn about animals that live under the sea?  Explained that some scientists dive in the ocean and observe the animals, or  they use robots and cameras to observe life in the ocean.  The children all stood up and pretended to be a scuba diver and swim around the room.  They then got in their own spots and laid on the floor like a starfish.  They spread all their legs and arms apart as far as they could stretch them.  They then put them to their sides and hid from the shark.  We then stretched out again.

Shapes:  Discussed:  What would you hope to see if you were a diver?  What would you not want to see?  I showed the children each puzzle piece and we discussed what we saw on that piece.  I then picked 6 different children to come up one at a time and put the puzzle together.  We discussed how each piece fit with another.  We discussed the picture that the puzzle made.

Dramatic Play:   Discussed: What do you think it would be like to dive during an ocean storm?  I laid the items they brought for show and tell on the floor and it would be under the parachute which will represent the water.  Each child grabbed onto a side of the parachute and we made big waves and calm slow waves.  I then picked one child at a time to dive under the waves to swim and see what animals they saw.  When they came up they had to tell us what they saw.  The kids loved this. 

Show and Tell:  Each child brought in and ocean animal or item.  Each child came up one at a time and discussed the object they brought and why they brought it.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: Mask and Flipper Art-They will use paint and finger-paint the mask and fin pattern.  They will tape cellophane onto the mask and elastic.  When they dry they can wear them around.  

Friday: Fish

Oct 21, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Brogan also showed us all the sign language words:  touch, shoe, banana, eat, apple, water.

Songs:  Sang the morning gathering songs, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Sea sponges.  The children then told me everything they know about fish.  Did you know that a group of fish is called a school?  Fun Facts:  Fish sleep with their eyes open. A baby fish is called a “fry”.  Fish have been on earth for more than 450 million years.  There are over 25,000 identified species of fish on the earth.  They can feed on anything from plankton to smaller fish/creatures or decomposing animals.  Fish can have 100 or more baby fish in a litter.

Global Citizenship:  Discussed:  What is a volcano?  Where are volcanoes?  Many islands have been created from an erupting volcano.  Some volcanoes are located underwater.  We looked at the World Map and found Galapagos Islands again.  Discussed:  There have been more than 60 volcanic eruptions in the Galapagos regions in the past 200 years.  We made a volcano using a container.  We added baking soda and the I poured in Vinegar and the kids watched the volcano erupt.  They loved this experiment.

Social Skills:  Discussed:  What colors do you think fish are?  Fish come in all different colors.  Each type of fish has a special color combination to identify it. 

Logic:  Discussed:  What kind of homes do you think are in the ocean? Explained that some creatures live in caves in the dark ocean, some in coral reefs, and others in plant-like areas.  Some ocean creatures don’t make a home, they just travel through the ocean.   We looked at the Charting Choices Poster.  We looked at the two different ocean scenes: coral and cave.  I asked the children where they would rather live if they lived in the ocean.  Would they live on the coral or in the deep ocean in a cave?  Each child came up one at a time and took the dolphin sticker and placed it in the ocean they wanted to live in.  We then compared the number of children that wanted to live in the cave verses the coral. 

Speaking:   Discussed:  What do you see on your way to school?  Each child told me things that they see on their way to daycare.  Discussed how what they see is not the same as what another child might see.  We played a board game and swam the fish to school.  They had to draw a card and tell what color of fish that was then take their game piece to the next fish that was that color.  They had to watch out because the shark or octopus that they swam by would send them back several fish.  Andrew was the first to cross the finish line.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Play with wooden blocks 

Thursday: Sea Sponge

Oct 21, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish. They reviewed the days of the week and months of the year.  They reviewed their sign language words.

Songs:   Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Seahorses.  Today the children told us what they know about Sea Sponge or sponges.  Did you know that a sponge is actually a creature that lives in the sea?  Sometimes the sponge is harvested, cleaned and dried out and then used for medical or cleaning purposes.  Sponges clean up the bacteria in the ocean by collecting it in the sponge holes.  Fun Facts:  Sea sponges live on the ocean floor, they attach themselves permanently to a solid location under the water and they do not move around.  Sponges feed by filtering plankton and organic particles from the ocean currents through thousands of tiny pores on the surface of their bodies.  There are approximately 5000 species.  Natural Sea Sponges possess remarkable powers of regeneration, they have the ability to re-grow lost parts and pieces broken off by water currents,  and have the ability to settle in another location and re-grow into a clone of the parent sponges.

Health and Safety: Discussed:  How do you think a sponge eats?  The sponge uses the holes in its body to collect food.  As the water passes through the sponge it leaves behind plankton for the sponge to eat.  We looked at the protein piece and explained that foods high in protein (like meat, fish, nuts and eggs) help our muscles grow and our bodies stay strong.  Protein is necessary for life.  Each child told the type of protein they liked the best. They then listened to the music and passed the protein around.  When the music stopped, the person holding the protein stood up and pretended to eat it.  We continued so several children got a turn.

Emergent Reading:   Discussed:  Have you ever been lost before?  What would you do if you got separated from your mom?  They looked at the Rebus Reader front cover and the children shared what they thought the story was about.  They looked at the key cards and discussed what each one was.  We read the story together and the children read the pictures to help with the story.  We discussed the story and asked questions for comprehension.

Visual Art:  Discussed:  How big do you think a sea sponge is?  A sponge can be as small as your thumb (a few inches) or as big as a car.  We looked at the sponges for the art project and found the holes.  Explained that the holes in a sponge help it eat and survive because the water is able to flow through the sponge and deliver its food.  The children blew through the sponge to feel the air coming through the holes.

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What do you think happens to the sponge if a piece of it breaks off?  Did you know that if a sponge breaks into pieces, either the pieces will make a new sponge or the sponge will reattach itself, possibly in a new shape?  The children took a piece of play-dough and rolled it into a long log.  They looked at the hands-on letter S and turned their play-dough into an S.  They continued to practice making the letter S.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Played with the Wooden Car, Tracks and Village  Center 2: Sponge Scene-  They put the yarn through a needle.  They practiced sewing the sponges to the background and creating wavy patterns in the yarn.   Center 3:  Fishy Prints-  The children painted with watercolors to make an ocean scene.  They then made fingerprints on the ocean scene and drew on fish fins. They also decorated the fish to make different patterns.

Wednesday: Seahorse

Oct 19, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Reviewed the days of the week and months of the year in English and Spanish.  Brogan told us the Sign language words:  water, touch, banana, apple, shoe.

Songs:   Sang the morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about starfish yesterday.  The children each told me what they know about a Seahorse.  Did you know that a seahorse is a fish?  Fun Facts:  Seahorses can come in patterns like “zebra stripes” and spots.  Seahorses change color to blend in with their surroundings.  They like to swim in pairs linked by their tales.  Seahorses cannot curl their tails backwards.  They feed on small living animals such as daphnia, cyclops, larvae of water insects, or mysids.  The female deposits eggs into the male’s small pouch, and then leaves.  Out of the entire animal kingdom, these are the only animals in which the male has babies. 

Social Skills:  Discussed:  What would you do if a big fish were trying to eat you?  A seahorse would change colors to match the plants and hide from dangerous sea creatures.  We looked at 5 colored objects and discussed the color of each.  I then had the children hide their eyes while I placed the colored objects on the same color of paper and hid them.  I picked 5 different children to come find the hidden object and discuss why it was hard to see. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What does a seahorse do to stay safe?  The seahorse uses its prehensile tail to hold onto plants in the ocean so it doesn’t float away.  We looked at the flowers with the letter S on them.  The children told me the letter and sound.  Each child told me something that starts with the letter “S”.  We then looked in the dictionary and found all the S words.  I showed them how to form the capital and lowercase S on the wipe off board.  Each child came up one at a time and practiced writing the letter “S”.  Brogan put the S in the flower pots.

Numbers:   Discussed:  Who do you think carries the baby seahorse eggs?  The mommy seahorse lays eggs in the daddy seahorse’s pouch.  The eggs stay in the pouch until the seahorses are born and then  they swim out.  We looked at the Pocket Counter Seahorse.  I showed the children a number and we then had that many baby seahorses come out of the daddy’s pouch.  We continued counting baby seahorses and matched them to the number. 

Emergent Writing:   Discussed:  If you had a prehensile tail, what shape would you want it to be?  Explained that in order to grab and hang onto things, a tail needs to be able to curl or wrap around items.  We found the S page in their My Little Journals.  We reviewed how to form the capital and lowercase S.  I then showed them how to turn a capital S into a seahorse!  They will be doing this in afternoon centers.

Show and Tell:  We looked at all the birthday cards that the children brought in for Finn.

Tumble Bus Day:  Form is by the front door.


Afternoon Centers:
Center 1:   Play with Little People  Center 2: Pocket Counters: Seahorse-  They will cut out the seahorses and numbers.  They will then staple the pouch onto the daddy seahorse and add their numbers and baby seahorses.  Center 3:  My Little Journal-They will practice writing their capital and lowercase S.  They will then draw a giant S and turn it into a seahorse.

Tuesday: Starfish

Oct 18, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Reviewed the days of the week and months of the year.

Songs:   Sang morning gathering songs, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Plankton & Jellyfish.  Today the children told what they know about Starfish.  Did you know that a starfish isn’t really a fish?  It is actually an echinoderm (pronounce eek-ene-derm), which is an animal with no backbone.  They took turns feeling each others backbone.  Fun Facts:  Starfish cannot swim, and they do not use gills to breathe.  There are over 2,000 species of starfish.  Starfish are found in the deep blue sea of the ocean and shallow water as well.  Most starfish have a spiky shell which offers them protection.  While the five-armed varieties of sea star are the most well known, not all sea stars have 5 arms.  Some have many more.  Take the sun star for instance, which has up to 40 arms.  Amazingly, sea stars can regenerate lost arms.  Discussed:  How do you think the ocean got so salty?

Environmental Science:  Discussed:  What do you think would happen to a starfish if it were on land instead of in the water?  Most sea animals cannot live outside of the water.  Water moves through the starfish (to deliver nutrients to the body.  We followed the directions on the Science Kids Tag to set up a water cycle experiment.  We placed a rock in the small container and placed that container into a larger container.  We poured water into the larger container without getting water in the small container.  We covered them with plastic wrap and then placed a second rock on top of the plastic wrap.  We placed the bowls into the window seal to observe the water cycle over the next several days.

Shapes:  Discussed:  Which animals do you think are dangerous to the starfish? Starfish predators include larger starfish, big fish with sharp teeth and even a shark.  The starfish’s  pokey and hard skin keeps it safe from many predators. The children told us the pictures they saw on the Discover Games Project Cards.  We then laid them face down.  Each child came up one at a time and turned the cards over naming the pictures.  The child chose one card at a time and if he turned over a shark, the game was over.  Discussed how many cards he/she could turn over before he/she found the shark.

Social Skills:   Discussed:  How do you think a starfish gets away from a predator (another animal trying to eat it)?  If a starfish is in the jaws of another creature it can “drop off” its arm and then grow back a new one.  We had a starfish made with Velcro and showed the children how the arms can come off and go back on.  We picked 5 children to hold each arm of the starfish and move in a circle.  They listened to track 7 “Poor Me”.  When the music stopped the children pulled on the arm.  We discussed if any legs came off, and then replaced the leg and played it again with a new group of children.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Giant Cardboard Blocks  Center 2: Discover Games Project-  They cut their own picture cards apart and could play the game with their parents at home.  They put the pictures face down.  Turn them over until they come to the Shark.  See how many cards they can turn over before they get to the shark.  Center 3: They will be finishing their My Little Journals from yesterday’s centers.

Monday: Plankton & Jellyfish

Oct 17, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Brogan is the new calendar and weather boy for this week.  He added the numbers to the calendar and discussed the weather.  He found the day of the week in Spanish.  We reviewed our Sign language words.

Songs:   Sang our morning gathering songs, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Today the children told me what they know about Jellyfish and Plankton.  There are more plankton in the ocean than anything else.  Plankton are any drifting creatures in the sea, including jellyfish.  They are the smallest part of the food chain.  Fun Facts:  Plankton are tiny floating organisms (living things) that are found in both the sea and ponds and lakes.  Plankton is a general term that includes every marine organism too small and week to swim for itself, Plankton is the basic food for all large ocean animals. Jellyfish have tiny stinging cells in their tentacles to stun or paralyze their prey before they eat them.  Jellyfish stings can be painful to humans and sometimes very dangerous.  But Jellyfish don’t purposely attack humans.  They dine on fish, shrimp, crabs, tiny plants, and will even eat other species of jellyfish.

Visual Art:   Discussed: How do you think a jellyfish moves?  Jellyfish float along the ocean current. Some types of jellyfish can use “jet propulsion” (they use their tentacles in one big motion to make themselves shoot through the water).  We looked at the jellyfish craft that they will be making this afternoon.

Speaking:  Discussed:  What is your favorite food to eat?  Did you know that many sea animals eat plankton?  There are more plankton in the sea than any other creature, perhaps because they are so small.  We learned the Sign for “eat”:  Place thumb and fingers together, as if holding a cracker.  Tap your fingers to lips twice.    We sang a song and the children used the sign for “eat” when we sang that word.  We replaced the food with the foods the children wanted.  Song was sang to the tune of “London Bridge”:  “I am hungry, let’s go eat Let’s go eat, let’s go eat.  I am hungry, let’s go eat A potato. “

Speaking:  Discussed:  What do you like to eat?  Explained that every living thing must eat to stay alive.  A food chain shows that typically large animals eat small animals, which eat even smaller animals or plants.  We looked at the 3 story sequence cards and discussed each picture.  The children then had to decide what order the pictures went in.  They had a difficult time figuring out what the first picture was.  Pictures: A turtle is swimming and sees a jellyfish; Turtle eats the jellyfish;  and Shark eats the turtle. 

Visual Art: Discussed:  What color do you think plankton might be?  Plankton can be all different colors.  Jellyfish are white, blue, pink, yellow, green, purple, red, orange and striped.  The bright colors tell enemies they are dangerous.  We looked at the purple color bird and discussed the color.  I then had small strips of purple paper that we pretended were Plankton.  The children closed their eyes while I hid the pieces of paper around the room.  The children then pretended to swim through the room finding the plankton to eat and put it on the purple bird.

Show and Tell:  Each child was to bring in an item that is purple.  They came up one at a time and explained their item and why they brought it. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2:  Jellyfish Art-  They will color a paper plate and then fold it in half and add beans to the middle.  They will then staple it shut and tape ribbon to the bottom of it like tentacles. Center 3:  My Little Journal-  They will go to the purple page.  They will color the bird purple.  They will then tear a piece of purple paper to make it a Plankton.  They will draw a picture to show what the plankton is eating. 

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