Browsing articles from "October, 2011"

Friday: Sea Turtle

Oct 14, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Reviewed the days of the week, months of the year and counted to 20 in English and Spanish.

Songs:  Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about sharks.  Today each child told us what they know about Sea Turtles.  Did you know that the Leather-back Sea Turtle grows up to 6.5 feet long (taller than most dads) and weighs about 1400 pounds (about as much as a bear)?  Fun Facts:  Sea Turtles eat softer food like jellyfish, fish, seaweed, and brown algae called sargassum.  Green Turtles are among the largest sea turtles in the world and weigh up to 700 pounds.  Their color varies between yellow, greenish and black depending on the species.

Global Citizenship:  Discussed:  What do you know about tortoises?  Did you know that the Galapagos Islands are home to many sea turtles and the Giant Tortoise?  Explained that a tortoise lives on land with legs and a turtle mostly lives in the water and has webbed feet and flippers.   They found the Island on the World Map.  They then counted the Islands on the map.  We looked at the flag for Galapagos Island and taped it to the world map.  Did you know the Galapagos Tortoise is the biggest tortoise in the world and can weigh up to 1/4 of a ton?  We had two large boxes that we turned into turtle shells.  We picked two kids at a time to have a Tortoise Race.  They put the box on their backs and crawled to the finish line.  Miss Corrie got to race Ben and they lost their shells.  They loved having this race.  Did you know the Galapagos Islands are made up of 61 little islands and 13 main islands?

Gross Motor:  Discussed:  What do you know about turtle shells?  Did you know that shells are attached to the turtle?  The Leather-back Sea Turtle does not have a hard shell.  Each child rolled into a ball and pretended to be inside a shell.  They then stretched their heads as far as they can, then followed with each limb.  Each child stretched their arms as far as they could.  Explained that the length from fingertip to fingertip is about the same as how tall they are from head to toe.  We measured how tall they are and how wide they can stretch their arms.  We wrote it on their little person pattern. 

Logic:  Discussed:  How do you think a turtle’s shell could be different from other turtle’s shells?  Turtle shells are all unique in color, design and size.  The children looked at each of the clue pictures and named each.  Miss Corrie read one of the clues and the children decided which picture that clue matched.  Clues:  I lay eggs, I eat seaweed, I am a mammal, animals eat me, I am an animal, I am green.  Pictures:  turtle, sea weed, dolphin.

Emergent Reading:   Discussed:  What do you think might cause trouble to a turtle?  Did you know that when turtles are on land they are chased and threatened by many animals?  We made a list of the animals children think might chase, scare or try to eat a turtle on land and in the ocean.  We played a game and had one child be a dog and the other children take a ball to pretend it was an egg and hide their turtle eggs before the dog chased them. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:  Outside Play 

Thursday: Shark

Oct 13, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella added the number to the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Reviewed the days of the week, months of the year and counted to 20 in English and Spanish.

Songs:   Sang the morning gathering song, days of the week, and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Dolphins.  The children each told what they know about Sharks.  Did you know that sharks have the most powerful jaws on the planet?  Fun Facts:  Whereas most fish are bony, sharks have skeletons made from cartilage-like your nose.  Cartilage is strong, flexible and light.  Sharks keep several rows of replacement teeth.  When they lose a tooth, another one moves into place.  Baby sharks are called pups.  Some sharks lay eggs.  Other sharks keep their egg inside.  And yet other sharks grow baby pups inside them, more like mammals.  The largest shark known is the whale shark, which reaches lengths of almost 40 feet or more.  The smallest shark, the dwarf shark, is only 10 inches.

Life Science:  Discussed:  How do you think a shark’s teeth might feel?  Explained that shark teeth are pointed, sharp and pokey.  Did you know that a shark has several rows of back-up teeth?  When he loses a tooth another grows in to replace it.  Discussed some objects found at home or in your room can feel pokey.  The children found things in the daycare that they thought were pokey.

Visual Art:   Discussed:  Where do you think shark teeth can be found?  Did you know that a shark uses and loses about 20,000 teeth in a lifetime?  Some of them fall to the ocean floor and end up attached to shells or coral.  The children looked at the shells and shark shape.  They discussed how they could use the items to make a shark puppet.

Numbers:  Discussed:  What would you do if you saw four shark fins sticking out of the water?  They looked at the counting card with the number 4 and discussed.  They counted to 4 in English and Spanish.  They counted the shapes on the counting card.  They used the foam triangles to count out 4 and place on the counting card.  We hid 4 triangles around the room and the kids pretended they were sharks and swam around the room to find the shark fins. 

Show and Tell:  Each child was to bring in 4 items.  They came up one at a time and counted out their items.  We discussed if they were correct and how to make it correct if they had more or less than 4.

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What words can you think of that start with the letter D?  We made two lists: one of the items found in the water, the other of items not found in water.  They looked at the hands-on Letter Dd.  Discussed the sound and letter.  Each child practiced making the sound.  They then practiced diving after the capital D.   

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:  Legos Center 2: Pokey Pictures:  They created pictures and put pokey items on it.  Center 3:  Shark Puppet-  They used markers to decorate their shark pattern.  They then glued on some shells for the teeth of the shark.  They taped on a Popsicle stick to turn it into a puppet.

Wednesday: Dolphins

Oct 12, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella added the number to the calendar, discussed the weather, and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We reviewed our Sign language words.  Reviewed the days of the week, months of the year and counting to 20 in English and Spanish. 

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Octopus yesterday.  Today we are learning about Dolphins and each child told me something that they know about a dolphin.  Did you know that a group of dolphins is called a pod?  Fun Facts:  Dolphins can stay up to 15 minutes under water, but they cannot breathe under the water.  Dolphins live in groups formed by 10 to 12 individuals.  There are 36 different kinds of ocean dolphins and 5 species of river dolphins.  The largest dolphin is the “killer whale” (also known as Orca).  Dolphins eat fish and squid.  Dolphins are between 5 and 18 feet long and weigh between 90 pounds and 10 tons!!  We used a measuring tape to see how big 5 and 18 feet are.

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What do you think dolphins like to do?  Did you know that dolphins like to play like people?  Many dolphins can be trained to do tricks, like balancing things on their nose or jumping through hoops.  We looked at the letter on the flower “Dd”.  We discussed the sound and letter!  Each child told me a word that started with the letter D.  We then discussed how to form the letter on the wipe off board.  The children came up one at a time to try to balance the flower on their nose, hand, etc.. or do a trick with it like a dolphin would. 

Social Skills:    Discussed:  What do you think it means to be loving?  Dolphins show their love by kissing and touching fins (like a handshake or hug).  They also show their love by bringing each other food, or helping an injured dolphin to the surface to breathe.  Each child shared how they would show their love to their family or friends.  I had each child show love to someone in the room and then they would receive a loving feather. 

Patterns:  Discussed: What do you think a dolphin eats? Did you know that dolphins eat fish, and fish eat plankton?  This is a food chain.  We looked at the pattern strip and discussed the pictures.  They continued the pattern with the extra pictures.  We then changed the pattern and the children discussed. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What is your favorite ocean animal?  What are some of its distinguishing features?  Did you know that many people mistake a dolphin dorsal fin (the fin on the top of their back) for a shark fin?  The dolphin dorsal fins is curved, but the shark’s fin is pointed and sometimes ragged looking.  I wrote the sight words on the wipe off board one at a time and discussed each.  Each child practiced using the words in a sentence.  Sight words:  I, am, the.  We then found the words in our “I Can Read” book. 

Show and Tell:  Each child came up one at a time and discussed the item that they brought.  They each brought in an item that starts with the letter “D”. 

Tumble Bus Day:  See form by front door.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:  Outside Play Center 2:  I Can Read Book-  They went through the book and circled the sight words: I, am, the.

Tuesday: Octopus

Oct 12, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Ella added the number to the calendar and discussed the weather. Reviewed the days of the week, months of the year and counted to 20 in English and Spanish

Songs: Sang morning gathering song, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about whales. The children will learn about an Octopus today and they told us what they know about them.  Did you know that most octopi are about the size of a large pizza?  The giant octopus, however, can be as big as 30 feet (about the size of a bus) and weigh over 600 pounds!  An octopus is an invertebrate, which means it has no bones. The children listened to the October CD “No Bones, Octopus” and they flopped around like an octopus.  Fun Facts:  Life span of an octopus depends on it’s species.  It may vary from 6 months to a couple of years.  The larger ones live longer than those that are smaller in size.  These sea creatures have three hearts.  Two hearts pump blood through the gills whereas the third one pumps blood through rest of the body.  Octopus can be kept as a pet.  However, keeping them as a pet is difficult as these creatures have been reported to have escaped from secure tanks due to their intelligence and flexible bodies.  They can have an arm-span of 25 feet and weigh up to 100 pounds.  Octopi change color according to their surroundings.  When they are scared, they turn white.  If they are mad, they will turn red!

Listening:  Discussed:  What does it taste like to drink ocean water? They each had a glass of fresh water and tasted it.  They then each added a little salt  water to the fresh water and tasted it again.  They didn’t like that!  We read a story, “Why the Sea is Salty”.  They discussed the story.

Fine Motor:  Discussed:  How do you think the smaller octopus can get away from a predator (a creature trying to eat it)?  Did you know that an octopus can squirt ink to color the water and make it hard for the other creatures to see?  They will make an octopus in afternoon centers using scissors.

Physical Science:  Discussed:  How do you think an octopus uses its tentacles (legs)?  An octopus tentacle has suction cups on it to help the octopus hold fish to eat.  They also suction to coral and other hard surfaces to help them hide.  The children used a suction cup to try and pick up small items. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  How many legs do you think an octopus has?  (Remind children of the transition song to help them recall the answer.)  (8).  How many legs do you have?  How many more legs does the octopus have than you?  They looked at the matching cards and named the pictures.  Explained that there are two of each card, like people have two legs, but there are eight sets, like the number of legs on an octopus.  We placed the round object on the floor and invited the children to pretend it is the head of the octopus.  We placed the cards face down around the head in lines to make the legs of an octopus.  Each child took turns turning two cards over to see if they could find a match.  We played this until all children had a turn and all cards were matched up.   We lined the matching cards around the octopus head for it’s legs also.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1:  Outside Play Center 2: Octopus Art-  Each child took a piece of blue paper and made it into a circle to tape.  They then cut 8 strips half way up the tube to make legs.  They added eyes to their octopus.

Monday: Whale

Oct 10, 2011   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.   Ella is the calendar and weather girl for this week.  She put all the numbers on the calendar and discussed the weather.  She found the day of the week in Spanish.  We reviewed the days of the week and months of the year.  The children get new jobs each Monday.  Please check the wipe-off board to find out what job your child has for the week.

Songs:  Sang morning gathering songs, days of the week and months of the year.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:  Reviewed what they learned about Coral Reef on Friday.  Today the children will be learning about Whales.  Each child told me something they know about a whale.  Fun Facts:  Whales have blowholes in the top of their heads to breathe.  There are two types of whales; Baleen whales and Toothed Whales.  Baleen whales feed on Krill and plankton.  Toothed whales feed from fish and small mammals.  Whales can swim as fast as 30 miles per hour.  Some whales can stay underwater for as long as 90 minutes.  The longest blue whale ever recorded was a 108-foot adult female caught in Antarctica.  Whales vary in size depending on the species.  The Blue Whale is the largest, reaching up to 100 feet in length and weighing more than 100 tons. Did you know that the whale is an extremely large animal that lives in the ocean, but it isn’t a fish?  It is a mammal just like you!

Speaking: Discussed:  When have you played near water?  We looked at the photos on each tag and discussed the picture.  We learned the Spanish word for each picture.  The children practiced saying the Spanish words repeatedly.  They then each came up one at a time and picked one tag at a time off the floor and told me the Spanish word.  If they didn’t need help they earned extra dollars.  Fish-Pez-“Pays” ;  Water-Agua-“A-gwa” ; Swimsuit- Traje de Bano- “Tra-hey day Ban-yoh”; Jellyfish-Medusa-“May-do-sa”

Social Skills:  Discussed:  What body parts of the whale do you like the best?

Visual Art:  Discussed:  How do you think whales breathe?  We discussed this earlier so everyone knew this answer.  Whales breathe air like people, but through a hole on the top of the back of their head.  It is called a blowhole and all whales have one, some have two.  Each child took a straw and practiced blowing the objects on the floor around.  Some of the children had a very difficult time with this.  Discussed how they will use the straws in afternoon centers to blow the paint around on their whale pattern.

Shapes:  Discussed:  What kinds of things can you think of that are shaped like a triangle?  We looked at the foam triangles and discussed the shape in detail.  We talked about how we could sort the foam shapes according to color and size.  Each child came up one at a time and picked a foam triangle and placed it in the correct pile to sort them all out by color and size. 
Afternoon Centers:
Center 1:  Outside Play Center 2:  There it Blows Whale Art-  They used the straw to blow paint around on their whale pattern.  They then stuffed tissue paper into the end of the straw to look like water coming out.  They added an eye to their whale.  They put the straw down in the blowhole.  

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