Browsing articles from "April, 2012"

Friday: Neptune

Apr 13, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the pattern and weather, and found the day of the week in Spanish.  He reviewed all the Spanish and Sign Language words.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what we learned about Uranus.  Today the children told me all that they know about Neptune.  Neptune is a blue gas planet. It is the farthest planet from the sun (not including Pluto, the dwarf planet).  Fun Facts:  Neptune is a large planet, nearly four times the size of Earth.  Neptune suffers the most violent weather in our Solar System.  Storms have been spotted swirling around its surface and freezing winds that blow about ten times faster than hurricanes on Earth make it the windiest planet.  Neptune is a large, water planet with a blue hydrogen-methane atmosphere and faint rings.  It is covered in thin wispy white clouds which stretch out around the planet. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What do you think Neptune looks like?  Through powerful telescopes and photos we can see that Neptune has many swirling blue and white clouds.  The astronomers think there is an ocean under the clouds.  The children made the swirling Neptune art the other day in afternoon centers.

Environmental Science:  Discussed:  What do you think a planet’s rings are made of? Neptune has six rings, just like Jupiter, Uranus and Saturn.  The rings around the planets are a combination of ice and rocks that have collected.  Sometimes ice chunks break off and get drawn toward the sun.  They leave a long tail as they melt and are known as a comet.  The children each made a comet by wadding up a piece of scrap paper and then taping crepe paper to it.  We took them outside and watched their tails blow in the wind.  I then had each child stand on the line and toss their comet to see how far they could get it to fly.  I counted how many of my steps ‘far’ that they threw it.  We compared everyone’s throw and discussed who threw the farthest distance and the shortest distance. 

Numbers:  Discussed:  Do you think there are more stars or moons in the sky?  Scientists have found many more stars than moons.  Neptune has 13 moons but hundreds of surrounding stars.  We looked at the 18 counting card.  We counted the stars in English and Spanish.  We then discussed how to make the number 18 with the hands-on numbers 1 and 8.  The children stomped their feet 18 times.  We took off 13 stars for each moon of Neptune on the counting card and discussed how many we had left.  Discussed if there were more stars on the counting cards or moons of Neptune. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What do you think it would be like to land a rocket ship on Neptune?  Scientists haven’t been able to land a rocket on Neptune yet because there is no solid surface to land on; it would be like trying to land on a cloud.   We looked at the hands-on Letter Rr.  Discussed the sound it makes and words that begin with that letter.  Each child came up one at a time to find the “Rr” on the alphabet strip.   They then had to point to the picture that could help us get to space (rocket).  I put the blue ball across the room and it was Neptune.  I picked two children at a time to come up and take the capital or lowercase letter Rr.  They had to fly around Neptune and back making the /r/ sound the whole way.  They showed me how fast their rocket could fly.  We continued this until each child had a turn. 

Show and Tell:  Each child brought in 18 items to show.  I had one child at a time come up to the front of the room and count out their items.  We discussed if they had 18 or more or less.  We fixed their bag if they needed more or less.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  

Thursday: Uranus

Apr 12, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.   Brogan didn’t want to do calendar today so Will did it for him.  Will put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found to day of the week in Spanish.  William reviewed the pattern on the calendar.  He reviewed the Spanish and Sign Language words.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what we learned about Jupiter.  The children told me today everything they know about Uranus.  Uranus is a gas planet with rings.  It is he seventh planet from the sun.  Fun Facts:  Uranus spins lying on its side (like a barrel), this is perhaps due to a large collision early in its formation.  Uranus was the first planet discovered by telescope.  Since Uranus takes 84 Earth years to go around the sun, this means that each of its poles is in the daylight for 42 years and in darkness for the next 42 years.  Uranus hides its interior but scientists guess that under the hydrogen-methane atmosphere is a hot, slushy ocean of water.

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What do you see when you look up? You cannot see Uranus unless you have a very powerful telescope.  It is a small planet and very far away.  We learned new sight words today:  up, look, see, the.   We discussed how to spell each one and read each one.  We practiced using the words in sentences and reading them several times.  I had the children read the “I Can Read Book” .  They knew almost all the words in the book because of the new sight words.  We then practiced all the sight words that we have learned so far.  The children also came up one at a time and found the sight words in the book and circled or underlined them.  Sight words:  up, the, look, see, are, you, and, it, is, on, at, in, I, a, go, we, can, to, they, look, for, find. 

Patterns:  Discussed:  How many moons would you like to see in the sky?  Uranus has 21 moons.  When a moon appears to change shape it is called a phase.  There are many phases of a moon.  We looked at the pattern cards and the children told me the pattern they saw with the phases of moon.  They then helped me add on to the pattern by continuing to add the correct moons.  We varied the pattern and did it again. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  Which planet would you like to visit? Most planets, like Uranus, are too far away to visit.  Even in a fast rocket ship, it would take many, many years to reach Uranus.  We looked at the R flowers and discussed what Rocket starts with.  The children told me some R words and then we looked in the dictionary to find more R words.

Social Skills:  Discussed:  What do you think it means to be truthful? Truthful means that you know what you are saying is the truth; you do not purposefully tell lies.  The children twirled their finger in a circle, then turned their hands so it spins sideways.  Explained that Uranus spins on its side.  We don’t know why but some astronomers think that maybe something hit the planet. Sometimes scientists have to guess to explain things.  But this doesn’t make it the truth.  It is just a guess.  Each child had to tell me about a time that they told the truth even though they knew that they might get into trouble.  I then gave them a truthful feather.

Show and Tell: Each child brought in items that begin with the letter R.  They came up to the front of the room, one at a time, and discussed their item and why they brought it.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: I Can Read Book-  The children will go through the book and circle or underline their sight words.  They will then color the pages. 

Wednesday: Jupiter

Apr 11, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Brogan added the number to the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  He reviewed all our Spanish and Sign Language words. 

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what they learned about a telescope.  Today the children told me everything they know about Jupiter. Jupiter is one of the planets in our solar system.  It is made of gas.  Fun Facts:  Jupiter is the largest planet in our Solar system. It is so big that more than 1,300 Earth’s could fit inside it.  Thick, colorful clouds of deadly poisonous gases surround Jupiter.  The quick spinning of the planet whips up the atmosphere, creating the bands around the planet.  If you were to descend into Jupiter, the thin, cold atmosphere becomes thicker and hotter, gradually turning into a thick, dark fog.  At the center of Jupiter is a rocky core, slightly bigger than Earth but weighing 20 times more. Surrounding the core is an ocean of liquid hydrogen. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What do you think you see if you look at Jupiter through a telescope? Jupiter always has a lot of storms.  There is often a big red spot in the eye of the storm.  We looked at the craft they will be making in afternoon centers.

Physical Science:  Discussed:  What do you think makes a moon look like it shines?  Moons appear to shine because they reflect the sun’s light. Jupiter has about 62 moons.  We went into the dark bathroom to do an experiment with a flashlight.  I placed the flashlight on the trash can and watched where the light shined. We discussed how the light shined straight.  I then put a mirror in front of the light and we saw that the light reflected off the mirror when I moved it in different directions.  I was able to shine the light on everyone by moving the mirror.  I then put a ball down and had the light reflect onto the ball.  We discussed how this is just like the sun reflecting onto the moon. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What can you line up? Discussed how we can line up blocks, toys, babies, ourselves, rocks, etc.  Explained that planets line up from closest to farthest from the sun.  We looked at the matching cards and we put the planets in order from closest to farthest away from the sun by lining them up.

Listening:  Discussed:  What shape do you think Jupiter is? Most planets are circles (spheres), but because Jupiter spins so fast it has flattened itself out in the middle.  (This shape is called spheroid).  What if the moon wasn’t round?  I read the  short story, “If I Were in Charge of the Moon”.  We discussed while we read and looked at the different shapes that the little girl made the moon.  Discussion Questions:  If you made the moon, what w0uld it look like? What do you think the moon looks like in the morning?  What other things do we see in the night sky besides the moon? If you were in charge, what would you do?

Tumble Bus Day:  See Activity Form by the Sign in Book.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: Jupiter’s Storm Art-  The children will punch out a yellow circle and glue it on the black paper.  They will then paint a red spot and then paint or color clouds around the red spot. 

Tuesday: Telescope

Apr 10, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Brogan put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  He reviewed the Spanish and Sign language words. 

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what they learned about the Earth.  Today the children told me everything they know about the Telescope.  A telescope is a long tube with lenses on the ends that help you see things that are too far away to see with your own eyes.  Fun Facts:  The Hubble Telescope weighs 24,500 pounds.  It cost 1.5 billion dollars at the time it was launched.  The Hubble can’t observe Mercury or the Sun. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What do you think you might see through a telescope?  Some planets and many stars can be seen without a telescope,but there are more planets and stars that can be seen when you look through a telescope.   We looked at the telescope we will be making in afternoon centers.

Shapes:  Discussed:  How could you find a star? Long ago, before maps, travelers used stars as guides and charts.  The North Star (Polaris) is a star that never moves.  We used the star Sorting Shape to create various designs on the Design Mat. 

Speaking:  Discussed:  What can you see far away in this room?  Some things that we can see without a telescope look different through a telescope.  We can see more details about items through the telescope.  We looked at the See and Say Tags and learned new Spanish words.  We put the Tags in a box and the children peaked at it through a hole to see if they could remember the Spanish word for it.  New Spanish words:  Moon-Luna (“loo-nah”); Star-Estrella (“Es-tray-yah”); Rocket-Cohete (“Co-ay-tay”); Earth-Tierra (“Te-er-rah”)

Emergent Writing:  Discussed:  What is your family name?  What are groups of stars called? Groups of stars are called constellations.  Constellations are named after common things such as bears, dippers, or other things.  I showed the children how to make Stars.  Each child got to practice making stars on the wipe off board.  They will be making stars in their My Little Journals in afternoon centers.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside play  Center 2: Telescope Art-  The children will paint a toilet paper tube. They will then add star stickers to it and a nut cap to one end.  They can poke holes in the nut cap to look towards the light and see stars.  Center 3:  My Little Journal-  They will practice making stars with a yellow crayon.  They will then paint over the stars with watered down black paint and watch the stars appear through the night sky. 

Monday: Earth

Apr 9, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish.  Brogan is the new calendar and meteorologist for the week.  He put all the numbers on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  He reviewed our Spanish and Sign language words.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what we learned about moons.  Today the children told me all that they know about the Earth.  Fun Facts:  The Earth is approximately 3-5 billion years old.  Planet Earth rotates around the Sun at approximately 1000 miles per hour.  Earth is the third planet from the sun and the fifth largest in diameter.  Earth is referred to as the Blue Planet because from space, the oceans combined with our atmosphere make our planet look blue.  Earth’s rotation on its axis makes a day at 24 hours.   Earth’s orbit around the sun makes a year at nearly 365 and 1/2 days.

Patterns:  Discussed:  How do you think the planets move without hitting other planets?  Each planet has its own path (orbit) around the sun, like lanes on a track. The earth is the third planet away from the sun.  We looked at the Put It In Order Planets pieces.  I described each planet and we put them in order of their orbit from the sun.  I showed them how they would move around the sun in their orbit. 

Numbers:   Discussed:  What do you think would happen if you tried to use more of something than you have?  We had a box that we turned into a bank.  I had a child put in 2 dollars in the bank.  I then asked the child to pull 3 dollars out of the bank.  The child couldn’t do that because there wasn’t 3 dollars in the bank.  Explained that you can only take out what you put in.  We did this with different amounts of money.  We discussed how we could take out a dollar and still have a dollar left if there were 2 dollars but couldn’t go over 2 dollars.  Discussed what the bank would do if you took out more money than you had in your account.  The Earth is the only planet we know of that has life on it.  There are many people and animals that live here.  There are things (resources) on Earth that people sometimes use more of than they put back.  For example, more wood is used than trees are planted.  We have to remember to put in what we take out when it comes to the Earth, too. 

Physical Science:  Discussed:  What shape do you think the Earth is?  Long ago people thought the Earth (world) was flat.  Now we know the world is round (a sphere) like a ball.  Each child came up one at a time and stuck their hands in a bag to feel the object inside.  They could not tell what they felt until everyone had a turn.  Everyone guessed the item was a ball but it was a special “Earth” ball.  We then tossed the Earth ball back and forth. 

Speaking:   Discussed: How do you think the moon changes shape? The moon orbits (circles) around the Earth.  This makes the sun shine on the moon from different angles.  The angle and amount of the sun that shines on the moon makes that part appear to glow, but other parts of the moon stay in the shadows.  This makes it look as though part of the moon is missing.  We looked at pictures of the different moons.  The children learned the Sign for Moon:  “Make a “c” shape with your right index finger and thumb, hold up to the right of the head.  Tap thumb to temple area of head.  We practiced the sign and then sang a song using the Sign for Moon instead of the word. 

Show and Tell:  Each child brought in an item from Earth.  They came up one at a time and discussed their item that they brought.  They then told me how the item came from earth. 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Swirling Neptune Art-  The children will watch the watercolor tablet dissolve in water.  They will use an eyedropper to suck the watercolor up and squirt around on the coffee filter.  Center 2: Outside Play

Friday: Easter Egg Hunt

Apr 6, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

All the children came to school today ready to hunt for all the Easter Eggs.  We had a blast finding all the eggs with candy and money.  Thank you for another great Easter Egg Hunt!

Thursday: Sun & Moon

Apr 5, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella added the numbers to the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We discussed the pattern on the calendar.  She reviewed all the Spanish and Sign language words. 

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what they learned about clouds.  The children told us everything they know about the sun.  The sun is the center of our solar system.  The planets move around (orbit) the sun.  Fun Facts:  As big as the Earth is, it’s pretty tiny compared to the sun.  We could fit the whole planet inside the sun 109 times, and use over 11,000 Earths just to cover the surface of the sun.  The sun stands a long ways away from us-almost 93 million miles.  Like other stars, the sun goes through several stages in life.  Right now it’s a main sequence star, which means it is relatively young and is burning through its supply of hydrogen.  In a few billion years, it will run out of hydrogen and become a red giant; the center of the sun will shrink while the surface grows larger and larger.  Eventually, it will get so large that it will swallow Earth right up, though by then there won’t be any life left here. 

Patterns:  Discussed:  What star can you see during the day?  The sun is the big star! It looks big because it is close to the Earth.  We used a sorting Mat to sort the foam stars according to size then color.  The children came up one at a time and did not look when they felt the stars to find the small one.  They then felt the stars and found the big one and placed them on the correct place on the mat.  They had to feel the stars without looking to find the correct size.  They then came up a second time to draw a star without looking and tell the color and sort them by color. 

Health and Safety:  Discussed:  What is your favorite thing to look at in the sky?  The children told me what we had to do before we messed with food: wash hands.  I then took an English muffin half and we discussed how it looked like a moon with all the craters on it.  I then put strawberry cream cheese on it to fill in the craters.  We added banana sliced eyes, grape nose and slice pear mouth.  Discussed how these could be rocks, stars, asteroids, or other materials on the moon.  We each then got to eat the moon!!! Yummy!!!!

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What is smaller than you?  What is bigger than you?  The sun glows yellow because it is a medium-sized star.  There are many stars bigger than the sun (red giants) and many that are smaller (blue dwarfs). We looked at the “Mm” flowers and discussed the letter.  We discussed all the words that start with M.  We looked in the dictionary to find more M words. 

Emergent Writing:  Discussed:  What color is the sun?  The sun has many colors.  The colors depend on how hot that area of the sun is.  Cooler areas appear orange and are called sun spots.  The sun can also appear pink or red.  We looked at “My Little Journal” and found the yellow bird page.  Discussed how they would color the bird yellow and make a sun and color it yellow.  They will then put pink, red or orange sun spots on it.  They will do this in afternoon centers.

Brainstorm/Fun Facts:   The children told me everything they know about the moon.  A moon is a round object that circles around a planet.  The Earth (where we live) has one moon. Some planets have many moons.  Fun Facts:  The moon is the Earth’s only natural satellite.  A natural satellite is a space body that obrits a planet.  Our moon is the fifth largest moon in the Solar System.  The average distance from the Moon to the Earth is 238,857 miles.  The moon orbits the Earth every 27.3 days.  The moon also rotates on its axis in around the same length of time it takes to orbit the Earth. 

Emergent Reading:  Discussed:  What name would you give a moon?  Native Americans have named the full moon of each month with different names: Wolf Moon, Snow Moon, Worm Moon, Pink Moon and Flower Moon are all examples.  We looked at the Hands-on “Mm” and discussed the letter and discussed what Moon starts with.  The children came up with a moon name that we all voted on and we decorated a moon together.

Listening:  Discussed:  What would you do if you were on the moon?  We looked at the concepts of print for the book “Star Seeker”.  The children told me the front cover, back cover, title, title page, author and illustrator.  We read the book and discussed while we read. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What would you bring back from the moon?  Twelve astronauts have walked on the moon and collected many rock and soil samples.  The children are going to make moon rocks after lunch.  They will mix the dough mixture with water.  They will then each form them into a rock.  We will bake them in the oven. The children will decorate their moon bags to place their moon rocks in them.

Numbers:  Discussed:  How many stars do you think are in the sky? There are billions and billions and billions of stars. There are so many stars, no one has been able to count them all. We looked at the counting card and discussed the number 17.  We counted all the 17 stars in English and Spanish. 

Show and Tell:  Each child brought in 17 items.  They came up one at a time and counted all the 17 items.  We discussed how to fix their bags if they brought to few or too many. 


Afternoon Centers:
Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: My Little Journal-  The children will find the bird with the word yellow.  They will color the bird yellow.  They will then make a yellow sun and put orange, red or pink sun spots on the sun.  Center 3:  Finish Moon Rock project if needed.

Wednesday: Holland Park

Apr 4, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

We had a nasty virus come through the daycare today so we only had 5 kids at school today. We took those children to Holland park to play!

Tuesday: Clouds

Apr 3, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  She reviewed all the Spanish and Sign Language words. 

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We reviewed what we learned about stars.  The children told me everything they know about clouds.  A cloud is a big collection of water drops.  They are small and light they can float.  Fun Facts:  High-level clouds, called cirrus clouds, are typically thin.  They do not produce rain and often indicate fair weather. They are usually made up of ice.  Mid-level clouds are referred to as “alto” clouds and have the name alto-cumulus or alto-stratus, depending on their shape.  They frequently indicate an approaching storm.  Low-level clouds are referred to as stratus clouds.  They’re often dense, dark and rainy (or snowy) though they can also be cottony white clumps interspersed with blue sky.

Physical Science:  Discussed:  How many different kinds of clouds have you seen? Each child took a cotton ball and touched his/her cheek and described how it felt.  The puffy cotton ball is like a cumulus cloud.  I then stretched out the cotton ball to flat  and held it up and this is like a cirrus cloud.  I then put the cirrus thin cloud and held it against the black paper and this is a stratus cloud.  The children will make a puffy cloud in afternoon centers.

Environmental Science:  Discussed:  How do you think you could make a cloud?  I had the children feel the bucket of ice.  I then turned the blow dryer on and the children felt the air. They discussed that they felt warm and cold.  We reviewed how fog was made.  It is made when warm air passes over cold ground.  I had Marissa and Ben hold Saran Wrap over the bucket of ice and then I used the blow dryer to blow the warm air on the ice and try to make a fog. We couldn’t see anything happening besides the ice melting when we tried this project. 

Shapes:  Discussed:  What is farther away, clouds or stars?  We looked at the star shape and discussed how many points it had.  I put my hand in front of star and blew it across the star.  It was a cloud moving.  The children realized then that stars are farther away and the clouds are closer to us.  Discussed how clouds move with the wind.  The children pretended to be clouds and float around. They then made one big cloud by holding hands and floating through the room. 

Emergent Reading:   Discussed: Have you ever seen clouds on the ground?  When warm air blows over cold ground or snow, it makes fog.  I picked 4 kids that were sitting the quietest with their legs crossed and hands in their laps to come up one at a time and pick a Looking Glass.  They had to pick the looking glass and then find that object on the theme poster.  They then did what it asked them to do.  Looking Glass 1: Star-Look and find a star on the theme poster.  Can you find a star shape in the room?  Count the points on a star shape.  Looking Glass 2- Planet-  Look and find a planet.  Count the planets.  Spin like a planet.  Looking Glass 3-  Astronaut-Look and find an astronaut.  Pretend to float in space (Miss Kim picked them up and helped them float).  Trace the circle of his helmet.  Looking Glass 4- Look and find the sun.  Raise your arms above your head in a circle.  What is the same color as the sun?

Show and Tell:  The children brought in a star item.  They came up one at a time to show their star item and discuss it.

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: Fluffy, White Clouds Art-  The children will take their cotton balls and stretch them out.  They will glue them to the cloud pattern. 

Monday: Stars

Apr 2, 2012   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar: Discussed calendar in English and Spanish. Ella is the new calendar and meteorologist girl for this week.  We said “good-bye” to March and “hello” to April.  Ella added the numbers to the new calendar.  She found the day of the week and month of the year in Spanish.  Ella reviewed all our Spanish and Sign Language words. 

Brainstorm/Fun Facts: We  looked through this months lessons to see all the different things we will be learning about. This month is about Space.  Today the children told me everything they know about Stars.  A star is a big ball (sphere) of very hot, glowing gas.  It creates energy that makes it heat up and shine.  Fun Facts:  A galaxy is a group of hundreds of billions of stars that are relatively close to each other.  Our galaxy, the Milky Way, contains over 100 billion stars. The universe has more than 100 billion galaxies with each galaxy containing an average of 100 billion stars. Just like human beings and animals, stars have their own life cycles.  They pass through many phases and die.  Stars explode when they die.  This event is called a supernova. However, very small percentages of stars explode. Most stars end their lives in different ways, some cool down to become white dwarfs and eventually fade into space and become black dwarfs.  Stars come in different sizes.  Some are smaller than our Sun whereas others are so huge that our sun is a mere dot when  compared with their size.  Lightening is about 3 times hotter than our sun.

Speaking:  Discussed:  What do you see when you look in the sky at night?  We looked at the Storytelling Poster and discussed everything we saw.

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What do you think makes the stars “twinkle”?  Stars shine a constant light, but the atmosphere (dust and rock parts) moving around them makes it look like they twinkle.  We looked at the star that they will be making in afternoon centers..

Social Skills:  Discussed:  Did you know that after stars are around for a long time they explode?  This is called supernova. I used the children’s name tags to draw a name.  I showed it to the children and if it was their name then they had to show me how they start small and grow bigger and bigger till they explode like a supernova.  We did this for everyone to see if they could recognize their name. 

Visual Art:  Discussed:  What color do you think of when you see the stars?  Stars actually glow red, yellow or blue, but they appear silver to us from the bright light made from the energy of the gas.  I had one child come up and find the star that matched the yellow bird.  I then had a child come find the big red star and they had to go find the biggest red item in the room.  Red stars are the biggest stars and are called red giants.  I had Marissa take the yellow star and find something in the room that was not the biggest and not the smallest yellow object.  This was a little more challenging.  Andrew took the blue star and found the smallest blue object in the room. The small blue stars are called dwarfs. 

Show and Tell:   Each child brought in a yellow item. They came up and discussed their items and why they brought them. 

 

Afternoon Centers: Center 1: Outside play  Center 2: Shining Star Art-  The children will use glue and glitter to make the first letter of their name on the star.  They will then decorate the star and tape it to the  craft stick.  Center 3: Name Tags-The children will practice writing their names on the name tags.

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