Browsing articles from "April, 2013"

Monday: Mojave Desert

Apr 15, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Dylan is the calendar and meteorologist for this week.  He was not here yet so we did calendar together.  The children discussed the pattern and put the numbers on the calendar.  We discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  The children reviewed the colors, shapes, Spanish and Sign language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about Plants of the Sahara.  Today we talked about the Mojave Desert.  Fun facts:  The Mojave Desert is named after the Mohave Indian tribe.  This desert occupies a significant portion of Southern California and parts of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona.  The desert is the reported home to more than 2, 000 species of plants.  The Mojave Desert contains the Mojave National Preserve, Joshua Tree National Park and the lowest-hottest place in North America: Death Valley, where the temperature can approach 120 degrees Fahrenheit.  

Creative Development:  Discussed:  What do your family or friends have that is made out of gold?  We discussed how people search for gold. They will make gold nuggets in afternoon centers.

Language and Literacy:  Discussed: What color are you wearing?  Where could you stand to blend in?  Explained that many small animals such as iguanas live in the Mojave Desert.  The animals of the desert often blend in with their surroundings, and can look much like the sand and rocks.  I showed the children how to make the capital and lowercase Ii. They came up one at a time to practice writing the capital and lowercase Ii on the wipe-off board.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  Where have you seen mountains?   What did the tops look like? Explained that the Mojave Desert has many square-like hills that are made from hard rock and sand.  They are flat on the top, just like the top of the square.  We looked at our foam shapes and discussed.  

Science:  Discussed:  What sounds can you make when you blow on objects? We took foil and wax paper and blew in them to listen to the different sound that they made.  Explained that some of the dunes in the Mojave (and other deserts) make humming or singing sounds as the wind blows.  

Show and Tell:  Each child was to bring an animal that lives in the desert.  They came up one at a time to discuss that animal.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1:  Outdoor play/Little People  Center 2: My Little Journal-The children will practice writing their capital and lowercase letter Ii.  They will then draw a large I on the paper and draw an iguana on the top of it pretending it is the mountains in the Mojave Desert.   Center 3:  Pan for Gold- The children will make gold nuggets using a flour, salt, and water mixture.  They will let them dry and paint them yellow.  They will put them in the pan to pretend to be panning for gold.   

 

Friday: Plants of the Sahara

Apr 12, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Lily put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  She reviewed our shapes, colors, Spanish and Sign Language words.  We went over the pattern on the calendar. 

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what they learned about Pyramids.  The children told me plants that they know that grow in the Sahara Desert.  Fun Facts:  Some plants that grow in the Sahara Desert are the herb thyme and cactus.  Because the Nile River flows through part of the Sahara, a good range of fruits and other useful plants are also grown, such as:  fig trees, orange trees, mulberry, date, lotus and papyrus.  Grasses, trees, and plants can be found in the Sahara, although nearly all species are hearty, drought-resistant survivors.  Desert plants have special ways of going long periods without water.  Many desert plants have roots that travel wide and deep to collect underground water. Leaves also help desert plants survive.  Some leaves have short hairs on them that trap water.  Other leaves have a tough, oily skin to help keep the water from escaping.  Some leaves also are very light in color to help reflect the suns harmful rays.  

Physical Development:  Discussed:  What have you seen growing by a river?  Explained that plants in the Sahara grow along the Nile River.  We looked at their I Can Write Projects and reviewed what they did on that this week.  

Language and Literacy: Discussed:  What foods do you eat that grow from the dirt?  Explained that iguanas only eat plants.  We looked at the capital and lower case Ii.  We discussed the sounds it makes.  I put them in a box that had small and large green pieces of paper in it (grass). I hid them under the “grass”.  I had one child at a time come up and dig to find one of the letters.  They had to tell me if it was a capital or lowercase letter.  If it was capital, I told them a number from 1-10 and they had to count out that many large pieces of grass.  If they pulled out the lowercase letter,  I would tell them a number and they would have to count out that many pieces of small grass.  We did this until each child had a turn to find a letter and count out the grass.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  What do you like to eat that grows on a tree? Explained that along the Nile River there are many fruit trees.  They grow dates, olives, figs and other tropical fruits.  I showed the children how to use tweezers to pick up pompoms.  We had a tree that had circles on it.  They had to pick up a pompom with the tweezers and place it on the tree circle.  We pretended they were fruit and counted the fruit on the trees.  Each child came up and practiced using the tweezers and picking up the “fruit” pompoms.  

Social Studies:  Discussed:  What is the name of your country?  Have you visited any other countries?  We looked at the World Map and found Africa.  We then looked at the Country flag of Egypt and discussed that this is one of the countries that the Sahara stretches across.  We looked at where the brown (Africa) and pink (Asia) lands come together.  In the brown that is where Egypt is located.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1:Playing with Play Dough and Large Card Board Blocks 

 

Thursday: The Great Pyramids

Apr 11, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Lily put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  Lily reviewed our colors, shapes, Spanish and Sign Language words.  We reviewed the pattern on the calendar.  Mallory was the only one that got it right.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about desert animals.  The children told me everything they know about Pyramids.  Fun Facts:  The Great Pyramid is the biggest and most famous pyramid in the world.  It’s more than 4, 500 years old.  Over 10, 000 people worked on building the pyramids over a period of 20 years.

Creative Development: Discussed:  What shapes do you see in a pyramid? Explained that the sides of a pyramid look like triangles, but the individual bricks are squares or rectangles.  We looked at the Pyramid they will be painting.  They will use a rectangular sponge to stamp it with paint.  

Science: Discussed:  What does dry sand feel like?  Wet?  I had each child come up and feel the dry sand and describe what they felt.  I then added water to the dry sand and they came to feel it again wet and describe what they felt.  We discussed what they thought might happen to the wet sand if we put it in the sun.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  What building supplies can you find outside in nature?  We had blocks and I had the children work together to build a building.  They first started to build their own individual towers but we discussed how we only wanted one tower that they all helped to build.  We looked at their tower when finished.  We discussed how sometimes people argue when they work together and how we needed to be nice and help each other.  We talked about how the pyramids were hard to build and they needed all those people to help each other.  Discussed how we could also build an igloo out of Ice cubes.  I showed the children how to build a pyramid with the blocks.  We talked about the letter Ii and what it would say.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  Why do you think the bottom of the pyramid has the most blocks?  We looked at the pyramid made from cheese-its.  We discussed why there would be more on the bottom than on the top.  We counted how many crackers were in the bottom row and each row after that.  The children noticed that it lost one cracker in each row until it reached the top.  The top row only had 1 cracker.  The children will build a pyramid with crackers in afternoon centers.  

Physical Development:  Discussed:  What do you do if you want a drink of water?  We looked at the Food Group Piece and discussed how water is important to our daily diet.  

Show and Tell:  Each child brought in an item that begins with the letter “Ii”.  They came up one at a time to show their item and discuss.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1: Wooden Blocks Center 2: Pyramid Art- The children used a sponge to stamp brick-like prints on the paper pyramid.  They then sprinkled sand on the wet paint.  We folded the pyramid and taped it to make it three-dimensional.   Center 3:  Building a Pyramid-  The children took crackers and made a pyramid by gluing them onto their paper.  

 

Wednesday: Small Desert Animals

Apr 10, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Lily put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  She reviewed our colors, shapes, Spanish and Sign Language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what they learned about camels.  Today the children told me what small animals they could think of that would live in the desert.  Fun facts:  Desert animals have evolved to handle the desert’s heat and lack of water.  Most can survive on small amounts of water and many get all of their water from their food. Some drink maybe once a week and travel considerable distances to find isolated waterholes and springs.  Large animals seek shade during the hottest part of the day.  Some animals dig a hollow depression into the ground and lie in the cooler soil while others are nocturnal.  BigHorn Sheep:  They use their hooves and horns to remove spines from cacti, then eat the juicy insides. Scorpions-They can reach a length of 8 inches.  Kangaroo Rat-have the ability to convert the dry seeds they eat into water, and they neither sweat nor pant like other animals to keep cool.  They spend their days in burrows where the air is moist and humid.  They are nocturnal.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  What do you do when the sun goes down? Explained that some desert animals prefer no sun.  Rabbits, snakes and coyotes are nocturnal, which means they are active at night.  We discussed rhyming words.  We looked at the I Can Read book, “No Sun is Fun.”  We read the book together and discussed the rhyming words in the book.  

Science:  Discussed:  How do you stay cool when it is hot outside?  We had a bucket of sand.  I had all the children come up and touch the top of the sand. They then dug their hand down under the sand.  They told me what they felt.  The sand was cooler when they went under the sand and warmer on the surface.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  What bugs do you see in your backyard?  Explained that there are many bug-like creatures in the desert, including ants, beetles and scorpions.  We counted to 17.  We discussed how to write the number 17.  Each child came up one at a time to practice writing the 17. We then looked at their journals and made 17 bugs.  

Creative Development:  Discussed:  How do you use your legs? I invited the children to all squat down on their feet and then leap with both legs.  They pretended to be a lizard.  I then had them line up one at a time and squat and leap as far as they could.  I marked where they landed with tape.  We discussed who jumped the farthest and who jumped the shortest distance.  

Tumble Bus Day:  Mr. Mik had the kids exercising today.  It was so cute to see them try to do push ups.  See the form by the front door to know all the activities they did today.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1: Outside play/ Little People Center 2: My Little Journal-  The children will go to the 17 page and practice writing the number 17.  They will then dip their finger into ink and make 17 ink prints.  They will turn those ink prints into bugs.   Center 3:  I Can Read Book-  The children will circle or underline the rhyming words.  

 

Tuesday: Camel

Apr 9, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Lily put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish. She reviewed our colors, shapes, Spanish and Sign Language words.

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about the Sahara Desert.  Today the children told me everything they know about Camels.  Fun Facts:  Camels can go for two months without water and can run for hours without stopping.  A camel’s kidney plays a part in helping the camel go for a long time without water: it concentrates the urine- some camel urine could be as thick as honey.  Camels can avoid perspiring by raising their body temperatures a few degrees, and thus preserving their fluid.  The camel’s thin legs are strong enough to carry not only its body weight (which could be over 1, 500 pounds), but also loads of cargo weighing 500 to 1,000  pounds.  A camel stomach is made up of 3 compartments.  Camels have straight spines, despite their humps.  A camel has two toes and a pad on each foot.  These leathery pads spread as the camel walks on the desert sand, making it easier to walk on soft sand without sinking.

Creative Development:  Discussed:  What do you think camels carry across the desert? We looked at the Camel Puppet that they will be making in afternoon centers.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  What do you think you would do if you had a hump? We sang the poem, “Sally the Camel.”  We sang it a couple times because the children loved this song.  We discussed how some camels have two humps and some only have one.  Discussed animals that have NO humps.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  What would you do if you had a hump?  What would you keep in it?

We will finish this lesson tomorrow as we had a special visitor come to see us today.  Andrew, Sophia and Lily and their new baby sister Bella came to visit us for a little bit.

Show and Tell:  Inside-Out Day!!!  We had each child stand up and show us how their clothes were inside out!!  We discussed more and less by counting the children that wore their clothes inside-out and counting those that did not.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1: Outside Play Center 2: Camel Puppet-They will decorate the camel.  They will then add a piece of fabric for the blanket on the camels back.    Center 3:  I Can Write Project-  The children will practice tracing lines.  They will then practice writing their capital and lowercase “Hh”.  

 

Monday: Sahara Desert

Apr 8, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Lily is the new calendar and meteorologist girl for this week.  She put the numbers on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We talked about the pattern on the calendar.  Lily reviewed the colors, shapes and Sign Language words. 

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about the Rodeo.  Today the children told me everything they know about the Desert.  Fun Facts:  The Sahara desert covers around 3, 500, 000 square miles, and the overall area is as large as the continental United States. The desert also has  the reputation of being the world’s largest hot desert.   On an average, the yearly rainfall here is even less than 3 inches.  Some of the hottest months have temperatures exceeding 122 degrees Fahrenheit.  In the winters, the temperatures drop below freezing point.  The Sahara desert is in Africa.  

Creative Development:  Discussed:  How do you carry water? Explained that a desert has very little rain and water.  To be safe, you must take water with you in the desert.  I laid some paper plates around the room to pretend they were oases of water.  I gave each child a souffle cup.  They pretended they were in the desert and hot and thirsty.  They found the oases of water (paper plates) to fill up their cups and drink some water.  I showed them the Canteen’s they will make in afternoon centers.

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  Where do you get your water? We looked at the title of the participation story to predict what the story was about; “Blue Men in the Sahara Desert.”  While we read the children had to pass a blue towel around and do different things with that towel that went along with the story.  Discussion questions:  Where did we see blue in the story?  What did the Sea Urchin do? (it squirted ink when I tried to catch it)  What is your favorite color?  Where do you see your favorite color?  What do you think it would be like to live in a desert? What would you take with you if you were going to walk across a desert? 

Social and Emotional Development:  Discussed:  How much water do you drink in a day?  We played a folder game with the children.  They each started on the starting place for their color.  They rolled the dice and had to move their marker that many places.  They then read the place they landed on if it said +1 then they got to take a canteen.  If it said -1 then we took a canteen away.  We played till each child reached the oasis.  We counted how many canteens each child had.  Explained that the longer you are going to be in the desert, the more water you will need to bring.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  Where do you play in the sand?  Explained that the wind blows in the desert and moves the sand.  This makes dunes.  Talked about how the lowercase “h” looks like a sand dune. The children came up one at a time and practiced making  the capital and lowercase “Hh” on the wipe off board.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1:Outside play/Legos Center 2: Canteen Art-  The children will paint the paper plates.  They will then staple them together adding a string and a souffle cup for the spout.   Center 3:  My Little Journal-  The children will practice making their capital and lowercase “Hh” on the journal page.  They will then make some lowercase ‘h’ on the blank area.  They will trace them with glue and add sand to make them dunes.  

 

Friday: At the Rodeo

Apr 5, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Thomas put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  He reviewed all the colors, shapes, Spanish and Sign Language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what they learned about horses.  The children told me what they know about a Rodeo and most of them did not know anything about them until we discussed.  Fun Facts:  It’s a sporting event where contestants show their skills in riding horses, roping cattle, bull riding, barrel racing, and other activities involved in ranching.  The term rodeo means to “go around” in Spanish.  There are many types of animals at a rodeo like bulls, horses and cows.  

Physical Development:  Discussed:  What might you see at a rodeo?  We looked at the I Can Cut projects that they did the other day in afternoon centers and discussed the things they saw on this.  

Social and Emotional Development:  Discussed:  What would you want to do if you were in a rodeo? We looked at the puzzle pieces and the children worked together to put the puzzle together.  We discussed the picture on the puzzle once it was together.  Explained that the rodeo is made of all the different parts.  Just one event would not make a rodeo, just as one puzzle piece would not make a puzzle.   

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  What is your favorite way to move? We used masking tape to make a large capital H on the floor.  We discussed the sound it makes and words that begin with the letter.  I had two children at a time stand on one of the side’s of the H.  They then hopped to the other end of the tape, walked backwards  jumped over the middle part of the H and then did any movement they wanted to that a horse would do on the H.  We did this until each child had a turn to move on the H.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  What shapes might you see at a rodeo? Explained that many corrals are made with wood and are square-shaped.  We looked at the square page on their My Little Journals.  We discussed how they made a square out of twigs the other day and then drew an animal in the middle of their corral. 

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1:Outside Play 

 

Thursday: Horse

Apr 4, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Thomas discussed the weather, put the number on the calendar and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We discussed our new pattern on the calendar.  Thomas reviewed the colors, shapes, and Sign Language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about lasso’s.  The children told me everything they know about horses.  Miss Kim showed us pictures of her horse that she had.  Fun Facts:  Cowboys ride horses because horses are fast and safe and can go where cars can’t.  There are different styles of riding like eastern (using two hands on reins) and western (using one hand on rein).  Cowboys usually ride an American Quarter Horse, native to the United States.  

Creative Development:  Discussed: How would you ride a horse if you were chasing a cow?  The children demonstrated this.  We looked at the horse craft that they will be doing in afternoon centers.  

Physical Development:  Discussed:  What treats do you like to eat?  We discussed what horses like to eat.  We made a horse snack for them to eat.  We used shredded wheat, fruit loops, chow mein noodles and dried apples.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  If you had a horse, what would you buy for it? We looked at the H Letter Set and discussed the sound it makes.  The children then told me all the H words they could think of.  

Show and Tell: Each child brought in an item that begins with the letter H.  They each come up one at a time to show their H items.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  How slow can you walk?  How fast can you run?  I had all the children demonstrate how slowly they could walk and how quickly they could run.  A horse moves in four basic ways:  walk, trot, canter and gallop.  Walk is the slowest, trot is slow, canter is fast and gallop is the fastest.  We looked at the hands-on 1 and 7.  The children told me how to make a 17 with those two numbers.  We counted to 17.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: Hobby Horse Art-  the children will decorate the horse pattern.  They will add eyes and a mane.   

 

Wednesday: Lasso

Apr 3, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Thomas put the number on the calendar and discussed the weather.  He found the day of the week in Spanish.  Thomas reviewed the colors, shapes and Sign Language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about Cowboy Hats.  The children told us everything they know about Lasso’s.  Fun Facts:  A lasso is a loop of rope that is designed to be thrown around a target and tighten when pulled.  It is a well-known tool of the American cowboy.  The rope for a lasso varies in length from 35 to 50 ft.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  What can you do with a piece of rope?  Cowboys use rope to make lassos to round up animals. We looked at the Look and Find poster for this month and discussed what we saw.  We had rope tied to the look and find glasses which were buried under the sand.  I picked a child sitting nice to come up and pull on the rope to get a Look and Find Glass.  They then followed the directions on the Look and Find Glass.  

Creative Development: Discussed:  What shapes do you see at a rodeo?  We used a rope to make a corral for the rodeo.  Corrals can be square, round or oval.  We made various shapes with the rope.  We then looked at the counting card 17.  The children helped count out that many foam shapes and put them in the corral.      

Social and Emotional Development:  Discussed:  What have you done that is kind?  Who has been kind to you?  Each child wrote something kind on a paper heart.  They each got a friendship band to wear and remember to be kind.  

Science:  Discussed:  How could you use a rope?   We looked at their My Little Journal’s.  Discussed how they will draw a picture of themselves.  They will then make a lasso out of yarn and glue it to their picture.  

Show and Tell:  Each child was to bring 17 items.   They came up one at a time to count out their items.  We discussed if they had enough or needed more or less.  

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1: Outside Play  Center 2: My Little Journal- The children will go to the brown page and color the paintbrush brown. They will then draw a picture of themselves.  They will glue on a brown string to make a lasso.    Center 3:  I Can Cut Project- The children will cut the pieces and make their own Rodeo scene.  

 

Tuesday: Cowboy Hat

Apr 2, 2013   //   by Miss Kim   //   Daily Lessons  //  No Comments

Calendar:  Discussed the date in English and Spanish and wrote it in number form. Thomas put the number on the calendar, discussed the weather and found the day of the week in Spanish.  We looked at the new pattern for this month.  Thomas reviewed our colors, shapes and Sign Language words.  

Fun Facts/Brainstorming:  Reviewed what we learned about cowboy/cowgirl boots.  Today the children told me everything they know about Cowboy Hats.  Modern cowboy hats are made of fur-based felt, straw or leather.  

Creative Development:  Discussed:  What types of hats do you wear?  What materials are they made out of?  Discussed how hats are made out of many materials such as straw, wool, paper and leather.  Cowboys hunt animals for food, and then use all parts of the animal for survival.  They use the skin (pelt) to make hats.  We looked at the hats they will be making in afternoon centers.  

Mathematics and Reasoning:  Discussed:  Where on your body do you wear a hat?  What if you wore it on your knee?  We gave each child a foam shape and they had to tell us the color.  They then had to place the foam shape on their head to pretend it was a hat and was protecting him/her from the sun.  They carefully walked to the box with the shape on their head and put it in the matching color box.  

Science: Discussed:  What color is your favorite hat?  We looked at the brown paintbrush and discussed the color.  Each child took turns taking the brown paintbrush and galloping to something brown in the room to paint.

Show and Tell:  The children were all to wear brown today!  They each stood up one at a time and showed all the brown on their clothing.  We counted how many kids wore brown and how many did not and discussed more and less.  

Language and Literacy:  Discussed:  What is the weather like where you live?  Many people associate cowboys with desert climates because a lot of cattle travel through the Southwestern United States.  We looked at the World Map and explained that deserts are found on all of the continents. We found the camel on the World Map (in Asia).  Explained that there is a big desert there called Sahara.  We looked at the title of the book, “Life in a Desert”.  Predicted what the story might be about by the title.  We then read the story and discussed while we were reading.  We discussed which plants and animals were similar or different from those where we live.

Afternoon Centers:  Center 1:Outside play/Little People  Center 2: Cowboy Hat Headband-  The children will dip a rope into paint and drag it across the hat to make a design.  We will then fit it to each child’s head.   Center 3:  My Little Journal-We went to the square page and discussed how corrals are made square. The  children used twigs to glue onto the page to make a square corral.  They then drew animals in the corral.  

 

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